CLEAR Annual Report 2012-2013

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The Centers for Learning on Evaluation and Results (CLEAR) Initiative was established in January 2010 as a multilateral partnership among donors and competitively selected leading academic institutions around the world that host the CLEAR centers.

The goal of the initiative is to contribute to strengthening partner countries’ capacities and systems for evidence-based decision making to achieve development results. Its immediate objective is to strengthen the selected academic institutions to lead capacity building in monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and performance management (PM) in their regions.

This annual report summarizes CLEAR’s achievements from July 2012 through June 2013.

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Annual Report
July 2012–June 2013
Centers for Learning on
Evaluation and Results

Centers for Learning on
Evaluation and Results
ANNUAL REPORT
July 2012–June 2013

i
Abbreviations iv
Foreword v
1 | Introduction 1
2 | CLEAR’s Foundations 3
2.1. Theory of Change and Key Performance Indicators 5
2.2. Strategy and Program Components 5
2.2.1. Regional Learning 5
2.2.2. Global Approach 5
3 | Major Achievements July 2012–June 2013 9
3.1. Regional Learning 9
3.1.1. Progress by Centers 9
Anglophone Africa Center 9
South Asia Center 12
East Asia Center 17
Francophone Africa Center 19
Latin America Center 21
3.2. Global Approach 26
3.2.1. Global Knowledge and Capacity 26
3.2.2. CLEAR Network Development 26
3.2.3. New Center in Brazil—Expanding to the Portuguese-Speaking World 26
4 | Looking Ahead 27
APPENDIXES 28
APPENDIX 1: CLEAR’s Outcomes and Outputs 28
APPENDIX 2: Overview of Work Programs 29
APPENDIX 3: Contributions to the Program, Budgets, and Expenditures 31
APPENDIX 4: CLEAR Phases and Timeline 33
APPENDIX 5: Governance and Management 34
Table of Contents
3IE International Initiative for Impact Evaluation
AFDC Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center
AfrEA African Evaluation Association
CERP Center for Economic Research in Pakistan
CESAG Centre Africain d’Etudes Superieur in Senegal
CIDE Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas en Mexico
CLEAR Centers for Learning on Evaluation and Results
CoE Community of Evaluators
Coneval National Council for the Evaluation of Social Development Policy of Mexico
CoP Community of practice
DPME Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation
GIMPA Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration
IEG Independent Evaluation Group
IFMR Institute for Financial Management and Research
J-PAL Jameel Poverty Action Lab in South Asia
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
PM Performance Management
RAC Regional Advisory Committee
RedLacME Red Latino Americana y del Caribe de Monitoreo y Evaluación
SLEvA Sri Lanka Evaluation Association
SNAI Shanghai National Accounting Institute
VOPE Voluntary Organizations for Professional Evaluators
Abbreviations
Looking back, 2013 has been an exceptionally busy and exciting
year for CLEAR—with significant progress on many fronts.
First and foremost, our partners—the academic institutions
that host the CLEAR centers—have expanded and deepened
their programs of capacity building in monitoring and evaluation
(M&E) and performance management (PM) with a variety of
constituents at the forefront of generating and using evidence
for effective development. Below are just some highlights that
are discussed in the report.
• The CLEAR centers have engaged closely with key government
and civil society agencies worldwide (for example,
the CLEAR Center for Anglophone Africa with the South
African Presidency’s Department of Performance Monitoring
and Evaluation; the CLEAR Center for South Asia with
Janasree, one of the largest grassroots nongovernmental
organizations in India; the Center for Latin America with the
Peruvian Ministry of Women and Vulnerable People) to help
institutionalize evidence-based decision making.
• Collectively, the centers have contributed to building regional
professional expertise in M&E by providing training to more
than 2,000 individuals through workshops and at community
of practice events.
• The centers have also generated useful knowledge and
research regarding M&E practices (for example, an assessment
of demand for M&E in Francophone Africa).
Cross-regional cooperation and knowledge-sharing has taken
place among CLEAR centers and their partners on several
fronts: how best to develop bottom-up approaches to capacity
building, generate demand for evidence, and share promising
M&E practices.
Through these efforts, CLEAR has achieved wide recognition as
a global program with regional roots. Based on demand, CLEAR
has decided to expand its regional and linguistic reach and add
a center in Brazil, which will also work with Lusophone Africa.
This has been our busiest and most productive year. On behalf
of the Board, I would like to thank the teams in the centers and
the Secretariat for their hard work and dedication to CLEAR.
This work - and the financial and advisory support from the
Board—advances our vision of development anchored in evidence,
learning, and mutual accountability.
Hans-Martin Boehmer
Chair, CLEAR Board
Senior Manager, Independent Evaluation Group of the
World Bank Group
Foreword

1
The Centers for Learning on Evaluation and Results (CLEAR)
Initiative was established in January 2010 as a multilateral
partnership among donors and competitively selected leading
academic institutions around the world that host the CLEAR
centers. The goal of the initiative is to contribute to strengthening
partner countries’ capacities and systems for evidence-based
decision making to achieve development results. Its immediate
objective is to strengthen the selected academic institutions to
lead capacity building in monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and
performance management (PM) in their regions.
This annual report summarizes CLEAR’s achievements from
July 2012 through June 2013.
1 | Introduction
2
3
CLEAR’s vision is “Development Anchored in Evidence, Learning,
and Mutual Accountability.” Through its network of regional
centers, CLEAR reaches across boundaries, languages, and
cultures to lead, innovate, and influence capacity building for
government, civil society, and others, with an overall goal to
support the development and implementation of evidence-based
policies and programs.
As of 2013, CLEAR comprises five centers (see figure 1):
• The CLEAR Anglophone Africa Center—University of Witwatersrand
in South Africa, with two partners: the Ghana
Institute of Management and Public and Administration and
the Kenya School of Government
• The CLEAR South Asia Center—Jameel Poverty Action
Lab South Asia at the Institute for Financial Management
and Research in India with partner, Center for Economic
Research in Pakistan
• The CLEAR East Asia Center—Asia-Pacific Finance and
Development Center, based at the Shanghai National Audit
Institute in China
• The CLEAR Francophone Africa Center—Centre African
d’Etudes Superieures en Gestion in Senegal, with partner
2ie-International Institute for Water and Environmental
Engineering in Burkina Faso
• The CLEAR Latin America Center—Centro de Investigacion
y Docencia Economicas in Mexico
2 | CLEAR’s Foundations
4
Figure 1. CLEAR Centers
Anglophone Africa
University of Witwatersrand Johannesburg (WITS),
South Africa • Kenya School of Government (KSG)* • Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration
(GIMPA)*
Francophone Africa
South Asia
Latin America
East Asia
Centre Africain d’Etudes Supérieures en Gestion (CESAG), Senegal • 2IE, Burkino Faso*
Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC), China
Jameel Poverty Action Lab South Asia (J-PAL) at the Institute for Financial Management (IFMR), India • Centre for
Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP)*
Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas A.C. (CIDE), Mexico.
5
2.1. Theory of Change and Key Performance Indicators
CLEAR’s theory of change reflects the overall program strategy
(Figure 2). It is based on a dynamic learning-by-doing model.
The centers engage in a complex set of parallel activities—
stimulating demand for M&E and responding to demand with
high-quality services—while concurrently strengthening their
own capacities in M&E. The global approach helps strengthen
the centers by enabling their participation in, and learning from,
their own regions and beyond. Thus, CLEAR is established as
a recognized network of centers that work on a strategically
selected set of activities within their own regions to support
the CLEAR outcomes. CLEAR’s Key Performance Indicators are
presented in Appendix 1.
2.2. Strategy and Program Components
As the theory of change indicates, CLEAR’s strategy is based on
a dynamic process of integrating regional learning and on-theground
implementation with a global approach for generating
public goods and knowledge in M&E.
2.2.1. Regional Learning
Regional learning is implemented by academic institutions
that the CLEAR program competitively selected to house the
regional CLEAR centers. The program strengthens the centers
so they can address the “evaluation gap” at the regional and
local levels and provide applied, practical, and innovative M&E
capacity-building services in the regions in which they are
based. Working with key clients and influential stakeholders,
the centers contribute to:
• Improved enabling environments and demand for M&E
• Strengthened capacity to produce and use evidence
• Critical mass of professional expertise in regions
• Innovation in M&E.
The program concurrently builds the selected centers’ leadership,
technical, managerial, and administrative capacities for
long-term sustainability. The aim is for the centers to become
self-sustainable after five to seven years of participating in
the program.
2.2.2. Global Approach
CLEAR anchors the overall program with its global approach,
by generating and facilitating internationally benchmarked
knowledge and capacity development in M&E and PM, supporting
peer-learning among the regional centers, and building
international brand recognition.
• Global Knowledge and Capacity. CLEAR develops, aggregates,
and shares global knowledge and expertise to strengthen
the centers’ technical and professional capacity (capacity
streams). In particular, it identifies and fills gaps in
knowledge at the regional level. The CLEAR Global Forum
facilitates peer learning, knowledge exchange, and mentoring
across regions on what works, what does not, and why.
The program also provides support to M&E communities
of practice (CoPs).
6
CLEAR Theory of Change
Highest level outcomes
Stakeholders use evidence in making decisions for improved development results
Higher level outcomes
Strengthened monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems and practices
CLEAR’s outcomes
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Strategically chosen capacity building outputs and activities
Establishing CLEAR and how CLEAR works
Regional knowledge and innovations enhance global learning
Promotes diversity in M&E
methods and approaches that
are context appropriate
CLEAR network
and centers are
established and
performing
CLEAR recognized
as a learder in
advancing M&E
regionally and globally
Global knowledge strengthens centers and regional approach
Resources underpinning CLEAR
Regional Learning
Responds to need and demand
Enhances demand
Global Approach
Donor funds and
center revenues
Advice and expert
support
Strategic
partnerships
Governance and
management
Stakeholders
Clients
• Government
• Civil society
• Non-prot
• Private sector
• Academia
• Philanthropy
• Donors
Leadership Development
Mentoring
Advocacy
Grants, Competitions,
and Awards
Knowledge Resources
Knowledge Sharing
Training
Collaboration with M&E Networks,
Communities of Practice
Technical Assistance,
Advisory
Diagnostics
Evaluations, Assessments
Other
Vision
Development anchored in evidence, learning, and mutual accountability
Mission
Through its network of regional centers, CLEAR reaches across boundaries,
languages, and cultures to strengthen monitoring and evaluation capacity for
eective and equitable development that improves peoples’ lives.
Revised June 2013
7
• Network Support. Through this component, CLEAR supports
the centers’ internal capacity and provides implementation
guidance to the centers. CLEAR also undertakes work
that benefits the CLEAR network as a whole (for example,
maintenance of a program-level website).
Appendix 2 outlines an overview of the work program under
each component (regional learning and global approach).
In 2013, approximately 87 percent of the CLEAR budget was
devoted to regional learning and 9 percent to the global approach.
The remaining 4 percent was used for program governance
and management, including regular monitoring and reporting.
Additionally, the World Bank Group provides its administrative
budget and staff time to support CLEAR. Appendix 3 provides
details on the budget, expenditures, and donor contributions
to CLEAR.
CLEAR was established with development phases and a timeline
to successfully complete those phases. The phases and
timeline and CLEAR’s governance and management structure
are explained in Appendixes 4 and 5.
8
9
3.1. Regional Learning
3.1.1. Progress by Centers
All centers contributed to four major outcomes in their regions,
although the emphasis of each differed based on its strategic
orientation and the contexts in which it operates:
• Improved enabling environments and demand for M&E
• Strengthened capacity to produce and use evidence
• Critical mass of professional expertise in regions
• Innovation in M&E.
Increased demand for M&E and the centers’ growing regional
recognition and reputation translated into a larger work program
than planned in some cases.
Anglophone Africa Center
Selected in October 2010, the center is hosted at
the University of Witwatersrand, together with its
partners the Kenya School of Government (KSG)
and the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration
(GIMPA). The center’s major achievements are highlighted
in the following boxes, with links to outcomes below them.
Diagnostic Study of African M&E Systems
A diagnostic study on the M&E systems of several African countries (including Benin, Ghana, Kenya, Senegal, South
Africa, and Uganda) was completed in collaboration with the South African Presidency and
with additional funding from Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit. Its
findings were formally published and disseminated as “African M&E Systems - Exploratory
Case Studies.”
With the success of this work, the center was able to win a contract to study the supply of,
and demand for, evaluation in five African countries (Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Rwanda, and
Zambia), focusing on the effects of the political economy on these issues. The study is being
funded by UK Department for International Development and supported through CLEAR.
This work is enabling a deep assessment of the issues in evaluation capacity building as
well as enabling the development of evaluative research skills and experience among local
researchers. The field work is complete. The write-up and verification process is ongoing.
The mapping will also be used to refine the center’s strategic approach and develop new
lines of work (for example, in Zambia).
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
3 | Major Achievements July 2012–June 2013
10
Training of Ghanaians Working on Social Protection Programs
The Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration organized a customized social protection results-based
management course in Ghana in May 2013. The training was attended by 46 participants who are implementing social
protection programs. The training focused on the development of log frames specific to social protection programs.
It was of immediate relevance to the work of the participants. This process was the first sensitization and training
process for M&E officials in priority programs in Ghana.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Partnership with the Department of Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) in the
South African Presidency
CLEAR Anglophone Africa has strengthened its relationship with the DPME, an ambitious and innovative department
that is putting into operation a government-wide M&E system. This relationship is multifaceted and has a number of
parallel activities . Over the period, activities with the DPME have included:
• Definition of evaluation standards and competencies
• Support to development of evaluation guidance documents
• Development and implementation of in-service training processes
• Participation on evaluation steering committees
• Supporting liaison work with parliament and other higher education institutions
• Co-writing the most viewed articles in the African Evaluation Journal based on diagnostic studies on evaluation
systems (880 article views to date).
This work contributes to strengthening the overall M&E environment within South Africa by helping set the rules and
incentives for the M&E market to evolve as well as developing the capacity of CLEAR Anglophone Africa and the DPME.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
11
• The center expanded the range of M&E topics and types of
capacity-building services offered to a variety of stakeholders.
It implemented technical workshops on impact evaluation
(in collaboration with the International Initiative for Impact
Evaluation [3IE]), customized training for the legislative
sector on using M&E for oversight purposes (based on the
South African experience), and technical assistance in the
development of government evaluation systems (for example,
work with the Department of Performance Monitoring and
Evaluation [DPME]).
- The center deepened its existing strategic partnerships and
created collaborations with new clients. The strategic clients
were DPME in the Presidency of South Africa, the Office of
the Prime Minister in Uganda, the Ministry of Decentralization
and Planning in Kenya (including the Monitoring and Evaluation
Directorate), and across 26 ministries, departments,
and agencies in Ghana. With the DPME, the center signed a
framework agreement based on engagements in the previous
reporting period. This has enabled the center to work as a
partner assisting the development of key products, including
evaluation competencies and standards, supporting
evaluation steering committees, and developing and implementing
in-service trainings on evaluation management.
KPI 1 & KPI 2
Leadership Development - Contributing to African Thought Leadership
in Evaluation with the Regional Voluntary Organizations for Professional
Evaluation (VOPE)
CLEAR Anglophone Africa worked with the African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) and past presidents of AfrEA to
catalyze action on developing African evaluation thought leadership.
The initial activity was a forum at Rockefeller’s Bellagio Facility. The forum was held to encourage fresh thinking in
support of the Made in Africa Approach to Evaluation program being established by AfrEA. It arose from a realization
that the ongoing emphasis on “building” or “strengthening” evaluation capacities on the continent without encouraging
the active promotion of “new thinking” about evaluation theory and practice will eventually impoverish the profession
and practice in Africa. This low profile of thought leadership in evaluation in Africa has to be addressed: to date,
evaluation innovations from Africa have been rare or largely invisible in shaping national, regional, or global evaluation
thinking and practices.
This forum has increased debate and action by leading to the development of working papers; the implementation
of a stream at the South African M&E Association conference; the embedding of ideas originating from the forum
within the CLEAR Anglophone Africa strategy; the launching of research grants related to the subject; and work with
regional civil society organizations to document their practices.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Key Performance Indicators
KPI 1. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their work plans
the capacity to address a range of M&E topics and methodologies
(increase from baseline).
KPI 2. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their annual work
plan the capacity to offer capacity building through a variety of
modalities aimed at different capacity objectives (increase from
baseline).
12
- The relationships in Kenya and Ghana mainly focused on
the delivery of training. In Ghana, additional diagnostic
work was also started. In Kenya, the center provided
inputs for the working groups of the Monitoring and
Evaluation Directorate. This was a challenging time in
both countries, given elections and Kenya’s shift to a
new constitution. KPI 2
Innovations in M&E through Mobile-Based Technology
Knowledge Resources
With its reference guide Mobile-Based Technology for Monitoring and Evaluation, CLEAR
South Asia has provided a rich resource for evaluators and researchers looking to use
mobile technology in their work. The tool provides an A to Z approach of the issues to
consider in adopting technology, plus presents case studies on how it’s been used. CLEAR
South Asia is also providing training and advisory services to integrate technology in M&E.
Topics in the Guide
Implementing Mobile Technology in Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E)
• Selecting the Right Technology Service Provider
• Estimating Costs
• Planning Timelines
• Training and Piloting Tips
• Ensuring Data Quality
• Ensuring Data Security
• An In-depth Case Study
• Common Implementation Challenges
Mobile Technology: Options and Opportunities
• New Data Types
• Multimedia Data
• Electronic Sensors
• Beyond Data Collection: Management
and Outreach
• Selecting the Right Technology
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Overall, the center implemented 47 activities: 14 training
sessions, 7 workshops, 4 events, 9 knowledge exchange
(sharing) seminars, 3 technical assistance programs, and
2 knowledge-generating programs (for example, mapping
of the supply and demand for evaluation within
the region). It completed 15 activities that were not a
part of its original work program. Costs for 21 events
were partially or entirely covered by the sponsors or
the participants. The center’s activities involved 631
participants; 37 percent of these participants came from
outside South Africa.
The overall quality of the center’s courses scored 4.32 on
a five-point scale. Ninety percent of the participants rated
the overall quality of the courses as good or excellent.
South Asia Center
The center at the Jameel Poverty Action Lab South
Asia at the Institute for Financial Management
and Research (IFMR) in India was selected in
December 2010, together with its partner, the Center for Economic
Research in Pakistan (CERP). Highlights of the center’s
achievements in 2013 follow.
13
Collaboration with South Asian M&E Networks and Communities of Practice
CLEAR South Asia was a sponsor and partner of the South Asian Evaluation Conclave 2013 in Nepal, organized by the
Community of Evaluators (CoE). The center contributed to the regional consultations in Dhaka and Delhi and to the
task committees for the Conclave. During the conference, CLEAR led a plenary session, organized and participated
in panel discussions on evaluation capacity building and leveraging data and technology for impact evaluations. The
center also organized a panel discussion on evidence-based decision making and a two-day workshop on the theory
and practice of impact evaluations.
The Conclave helped foster ties and deepen collaborations with organizations and agencies committed to improving
evaluation in the region. For instance, the center partnered with the Sri Lanka Evaluation Association (SLEvA) for
the biennial Sri Lanka Evaluation Conference. The center is continuing to collaborate with Voluntary Organizations
for Professional Evaluation (VOPE) in the region to organize workshops and roundtables to build evaluation capacity
and demand.
Roundtable Knowledge Sharing on M&E Topics
CLEAR South Asia initiated a series of roundtable discussions on M&E topics in New Delhi. There were four roundtables
between July 2012 and June 2013, organized in collaboration with organizations such as UNICEF, Self-Employed
Women’s Association (SEWA), International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3IE), and CoE. Sector specialists and
center staff presented on various M&E topics: instrument design, experimental and quasi-experimental evaluation
methods, equity-focused evaluation methods, systematic reviews, and scaling up proven interventions.
Nearly 200 people from the center’s network in India and other South Asian countries attended. The roundtables
were broadcast live on the Internet and attracted an audience of more than 900 viewers.
These roundtables provide a unique opportunity for knowledge sharing, awareness building, and networking and have
become very popular. The center is launching a new series of roundtables in November 2013 on gender, evaluation,
and empowerment with CoE and UN Women, and plans to take the roundtable to other cities.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
14
Strengthening Indian State Level Governments’ M&E Capacity
At the state level, CLEAR South Asia has also seen a growing interest and demand for M&E. The center is providing
capacity development and technical support to the state government of Haryana to strengthen M&E systems and
processes. CLEAR South Asia has helped set up an evaluation unit, Research and Experiments for Action and Policy to
oversee the M&E of ongoing projects such as a Midday Meal Scheme, teacher training, and Meena Manch (Adolescent
Girl Clubs) to inform education policies. CLEAR South Asia is developing the capacity of the evaluation unit’s core
team and district-level staff through workshops, data collection, and technical advisory services. The center has
also provided training and capacity building in setting up, developing, and promoting a pilot school monitoring and
mentoring framework system.
The center supported a hands-on evaluation of the government’s Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation Program
and Learning Enhancement Program. These efforts have helped institutionalize and foster action-based field research
in Haryana underpinning education policy.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Training for Indian Economic Service Officers
Although most government officials receive some training in monitoring, the training does not provide skills necessary
to implement and understand M&E . To bridge this gap, CLEAR South Asia was invited to conduct a two-week M&E
course for incoming Indian Economic Service officers.
The course was very well received and led to further engagement with the Department of Economic Affairs, which has
requested an additional course for mid-career officers. CLEAR South Asia is currently conducting a needs assessment
with mid-career officers posted in regional evaluation offices. In addition, the center used a fee-charging model for
this activity and is building a sustainable revenue stream from this engagement.
The Ministry of Finance is also looking into the possibility of setting up a National Institute for Economic Policy to
build skills of government officers. The Ministry has invited CLEAR to provide inputs.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
15
Capacity Building for Civil Society and Nongovernmental Organizations to
Institutionalize and Improve M&E Processes
CLEAR South Asia is building the capacity of civil society and nongovernment organizations to institutionalize and
improve M&E processes. The center is partnering with Breakthrough, a well-known nonprofit in India and the United
States that works on human rights.
The center conducted hands-on M&E capacity building activities such as a series of customized workshops for their
core and field teams alongside an evaluation of a pilot, school-based gender awareness and mobilization program.
The first two-day workshop in the series was held in July 2013 and successfully promoted evaluative thinking for the
program design.
CLEAR South Asia is also providing advisory services on evaluations and helping pilot M&E using the technology to
make data collection more effective.
In addition, CLEAR South Asia has helped build the capacity of their leaders (leadership development) through its
awareness-raising executive education course at the South Asian Evaluation Conclave.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Toolkit for Impact Evaluability Assessment
CLEAR South Asia is advising the staff of the U.S. Agency for International Development in India on how to integrate
impact evaluation for learning and accountability. The Agency has a global evaluation policy that includes impact
evaluation, but the India mission has never commissioned one before. Therefore, the Agency sought advice on how
to meaningfully incorporate impact evaluation into the work. The center is developing an impact evaluability toolkit,
which will help technical teams asses the feasibility of conducting impact evaluation  and help management develop
a research agenda.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
16
• In 2013 the center conducted a wide range of M&E training
sessions, customized workshops, policy dialogues, and
knowledge exchange (sharing) seminars. Topics ranged from
systematic reviews to implementing monitoring systems; the
programs reached more than 600 participants. Since the
beginning of the program, the center has reached more than
1,850 participants from civil society, government, academia,
the private sector, and donor communities.
- The center deepened its networks within the evaluation
community with key players, including the Community
of Evaluators (CoE), the Sri Lanka Evaluation Association
(SLEvA), EvalPartners, and Bangladesh Rural Advancement
Committee, the biggest nongovernmental organization in
Bangladesh. For example, the center was a sponsor and
partner of the South Asian Evaluation Conclave organized
by the CoE in Nepal in February 2013 and a partner in
the SLEvA conference in July 2013. The center is working
with CoE and SLEvA to organize other knowledge-sharing
and capacity-building programs. KPI 1 & KPI 2
- The center began organizing a series of roundtable discussions
(which were webcast) on various M&E topics,
with almost 900 viewers across the region. KPI 1
- The center has provided more than 100 days of advisory
services to a range of constituents. For example, the
center is building the capacity of the government of Haryana
to carry out systematic research, strengthen the M&E
systems of ongoing government schemes, and meet the
pressing challenges in the field of education. The center
is also providing hands-on support for the evaluations the
government is conducting. The center plans to initiate this
work with other agencies as well (for example, with the
emerging Independent Evaluation Office in India). KPI 2
Key Performance Indicators
KPI 1. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their work plans
the capacity to address a range of M&E topics and methodologies
(increase from baseline).
KPI 2. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their annual work
plan the capacity to offer capacity building through a variety of
modalities aimed at different capacity objectives (increase from
baseline).
In 2013, the center implemented 33 client capacitybuilding
activities: 16 training workshops, 5 knowledge
exchange (sharing) seminars, 4 technical assistance
programs, 5 partnerships activities (such as sponsoring a
regional M&E conference by the South Asia Community
of Evaluators), 1 evaluation/assessment/advisory, 1 diagnostic,
and the publication of 1 knowledge resource. The
center also implemented 18 internal capacity building
activities. For eight activities, the costs were covered
by the sponsors or the participants.
The center made a concerted effort to extend its presence
in South Asia, organizing capacity-building programs in
five countries (Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and
Sri Lanka). Almost 46 percent of the center’s workshop
participants were from South Asian countries other
than India.
Eight-five percent of the center’s clients rated the quality
of the center’s activities above 4 on a five-point scale.
Seventy-five percent of clients rated the relevance of the
capacity-building services above 4 on a five-point scale.
17
Knowledge Sharing for Improved M&E Practices
CLEAR East Asia organized an alumni experience-sharing seminar for past training program participants, including
key government officials engaged in monitoring and commissioning evaluations. Seminar attendees shared how
they used the performance evaluation techniques they had learned to improve their work. They also gained fresh
perspectives and ideas from their peers about how to deal with challenges in implementing M&E.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Herbert Batidzirai, from South Africa, on how the Shanghai International Program in Development Evaluation Training has helped
his career
“In 2008, I attended the first Shanghai International Program of
Development Evaluation Training. The training program reinforced
the skills I had gained through earlier evaluation training, which I
had attended in 2005 in Canada. Thanks to my M&E skills, I have
been selected to participate in the economic development sector
forum meetings led by the South African National Treasury. In
the forum, I have been active in crafting sector indicators for all
economic sector departments, including the development of a
compendium of technical indicators. In 2009, I participated in the
South African Monitoring and Evaluation Association meetings and
conference held in Johannesburg. I have been active in trying to
establish an association chapter in the Eastern Cape Province. I
was also appointed as a team member of an M&E learning network
task team under the South Africa’s Presidency’s in 2009 (http://
www.thepresidency.gov.za/pebble.asp?relid=1717). The South
African Presidency created a Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) and is trying to implement sound M&E principles
throughout the South African public sector.”
East Asia Center
The center at Asia-Pacific Finance and Development
Center (AFDC) at Shanghai National
Accounting Institute (SNAI) in China was grandfathered
into the CLEAR program because of its
ongoing engagement since 2007 with the Independent Evaluation
Group of the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank
on evaluation capacity building in East Asia. The center’s main
accomplishments in 2013 are summarized below.
18
• The center broadened its work to include training sessions,
knowledge-exchange/sharing, and evaluation/research work.
- The center provided training sessions on impact evaluation,
performance-based budgeting, technical data
analysis, as well as the use of evaluation evidence for
policy makers, and customized M&E systems design
for field workers. KPI 1
- The center is conducting research for the Ministry of
Finance comparing the evaluation methods of international
financial institutions with China’s fiscal expenditure
evaluation methods. In addition, the center is revising the
handbook of international financial institution evaluations
in China. KPI 1 & KPI 2
- The center collaborated with SNAI to train more than 2,200
national accountants and government officials on M&E:
both SNAI and AFDC are under the Ministry of Finance,
which enables a smooth collaboration; the clients of the
center can also benefit from the SNAI network and helps
drive results-based management in the country. KPI 2
Advising the City of Shanghai on its M&E System
As a result of participating in CLEAR East Asia’s M&E capacity building programs, the City of Shanghai invited an
expert from the center to begin advising on designing M&E systems and processes. This work commenced in early
2013. In addition, the Ministry of Finance of China invited the center to begin organizing a seminar on best practices in
M&E for several provincial officials from financial bureaus to raise their awareness regarding evaluation, as a precursor
to the government’s plan to roll out a larger government-wide initiative in M&E.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Key Performance Indicators
KPI 1. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their work plans
the capacity to address a range of M&E topics and methodologies
(increase from baseline).
KPI 2. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their annual work
plan the capacity to offer capacity building through a variety of
modalities aimed at different capacity objectives (increase from
baseline).
In 2013 the center implemented 12 activities, including
8 training sessions, 2 knowledge exchange (sharing)
seminars, 1 program of research, and 1 advisory service.
Of these, seven activities were for participants at the
regional level and three were especially for the Chinese
participants.
Of the 472 participants, 246 were from Mainland China
(52 percent), and 377 (80 percent) were government
officials.
Every participant who attended the training sessions
rated the overall quality of the courses as good or excellent
(4 or higher on a five-point scale).
19
Francophone Africa Center
In March 2011, CLEAR’s Board approved the
expansion of CLEAR’s operations to Francophone
Africa, because of the high interest in
and demand for the program in this region. The
Centre African d’Etudes Superieures en Gestion (CESAG) was
selected as a CLEAR Francophone Center in October 2011.
The center formally opened in June 2013. Highlights from this
center follow.
Study to Assess Demand for M&E in Francophone Countries
CLEAR Francophone Africa conducted an assessment of demand in M&E for Benin, Mauritania, and Senegal. The
results of the assessment was provided to each country and is being used to ensure the relevance of the center’s
programs. The assessment found that the three countries were at different stages of development of their M&E
systems, requiring different entry points for capacity building.
An innovative framework was used for the study, which consisted of a set of questions to assess national evaluation
capacities. The aggregate response for each country was used to place the country on a scale from 0 to 5: Mauritania
has a nascent system (scale 1) , Senegal is in the middle (scale 2) , and Benin has the most robust system of the
three (scale 3).
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Training in Results-Based Management
CLEAR Francophone Africa developed a results-based M&E course, with the help of an international consultant
from the University of Laval and based on materials from the World Bank Group. The materials were piloted first at
a one-week train-the-trainers workshop in Senegal (July 15-19 ) and subsequently at a second, week-long training of
trainers in Burkina Faso (July 30 – August 3).
A total of 47 participants attended, who were selected based on their expertise in M&E. These training sessions also
served as a pilot during which the center gathered feedback on how to improve and adapt this results-based M&E
course for future offerings.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
20
• Being in the first year of its operation, the center concentrated
on activities that helped in its establishment and
worked on its strategy.
- The center began operations by conducting an in-depth
assessment of demand for, and supply of, M&E capacity
building in collaboration with an international consultant
and locally based researchers. KPI 1
- The center supported and participated in the first Benin
Evaluation Days Conference (July 2-4, 2012) with peers
from the Anglophone Africa Center. More than 250 people
attended the conference, which provided an opportunity
to reflect on the institutionalization of evaluation. It was
also a forum to inform the audience regarding the activities
of the CLEAR center. KPI 2
Key Performance Indicators
KPI 1. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their work plans
the capacity to address a range of M&E topics and methodologies
(increase from baseline).
KPI 2. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their annual work
plan the capacity to offer capacity building through a variety of
modalities aimed at different capacity objectives (increase from
baseline).
Since its formal opening, the center has implemented
four training sessions, one technical assistance activity,
and one diagnostic study. It has also contributed to
knowledge exchange seminars.
Participants from Senegal accounted for 48 percent of
attendees for two train-the-trainers session and the first
seminar for professionals.
All clients rated the quality of the center’s services highly
(4 or higher on a five-point scale).
21
Latin America Center
The CLEAR Latin America center at the Centro
de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas (CIDE)
in Mexico was selected in December 2011 and
officially launched by Mexico’s President Felipe Caldreron in
June 2012. The center’s major achievements are noted below.
Seminar Series on Evaluation of Public Security
CLEAR Latin America organized the Permanent
Discussion Seminar on Evaluation of Public Security.
In each session, stakeholders from civil society,
academia, and public service joined to discuss public
security issues. As convener, the center promoted a
space of dialogue and trust where participants could
share their experiences and views and start building
consensus and collaboration agreements.
This is an innovative approach that focuses on an area
of public policy relatively unexplored in terms of M&E.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
22
Building Sub-national M&E Capacity
CLEAR Latin America signed an agreement with the local government of Bacalar in Mexico to provide technical
assistance on a performance-based management diagnosis and a capacity development strategy.
The diagnosis included a comprehensive assessment of the current state of the mechanisms and procedures for M&E
and set the basis for a strategy that addresses the interactions between institutions and civil society stakeholders
in key sectors.
Another agreement was signed with the state government of Jalisco to assist in the transition from a traditional
monitoring system to a results-oriented M&E system. The activities included the development of indicators for the
state’s social programs. As a result of the strengthened relationship between CLEAR Latin America and the government
of Jalisco, the general coordinator of CLEAR Latin America was invited to join the Independent Technical Evaluation
Committee for Public Policy of the state, and other committee members are pursuing a diploma in evaluation and
public policy imparted by CLEAR Latin America.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
23
Technical Assistance in M&E to Countries Across Latin America
CLEAR Latin America provided technical assistance to the government of Peru, El Salvador Presidency, and the
Ministry of Social Transformation, Youth, and Sports of St. Lucia.
In Peru, technical assistance was provided to the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable People to create a monitoring
index based on administrative and census information.
A diagnosis was developed, followed by workshops, to contribute to the consolidation of the practice of monitoring
and evaluation, and the measurement of poverty in El Salvador. Thanks to CLEAR Latin America’s initiative, National
Council for the Evaluation of Social Development Policy of Mexico (Coneval) officials met with their peers from El
Salvador to share their experiences and knowledge.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
24
Meta-Evaluations of Social Programs
CLEAR Latin America conducted a meta evaluation (2007-2012) for the following social programs under the Ministry
of Social Development in Mexico: Programa de Opciones Productivas, Programa de Empleo Temporal, Programa de
Estancias Infantiles para Apoyar a Madres Trabajadoras and Programas del Fondo Nacional para el Fomento de las
Artesanías.
A second meta evaluation (2011-2012) was conducted for the Consistence and Results Evaluation Reports of Coneval.
Through an assessment instrument, all reports were analyzed to measure the quality of contents.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
25
• The center engaged in a broad array of capacity development
approaches across a variety of topics.
- Participants from government, civil society, and academic
communities across Latin America received training in a
broad set of topics, such as M&E methods, logic frameworks,
performance-based budgeting, impact evaluations,
and the use of STATA. The center is beginning to provide
more specialized and advance courses. KPI 1
- The center organized 15 knowledge exchange seminars.
For example, an international seminar on M & E country
systems was co-organized by the center, the Argentine
government (Council of Ministries of the Presidency),
and the University of Buenos Aires. The center also coorganized
the annual meeting of the Red Latinoamericana
de Monitoreo y Evaluación en América Latina y el Caribe
(RedLacME) in collaboration with the World Bank and the
Inter-American Development Bank. KPI 2
• The center has organized two international seminars in
Mexico City on advances and challenges in social policy and
subnational M&E and PM systems. KPI 1 & KPI 2
- The center provided technical assistance to the governments
of Peru and El Salvador, the Mexican Ministry of
Finance, the Mexican Ministry of Social Development,
and other local and state governments on several topics
related to M&E. KPI 2
- The center established new strategic alliances/collaboration
agreements with the Latin American and the Caribbean
Network of M&E and Systematization and with other key
actors of the evaluation community such as the International
Program for Development Evaluation Training,
the CLAD, UN-Women, Organization of American States,
Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, and
the United Nations Development Programme. Strategic
partnerships were selected based on the potential they
offer to enhance regional networking for the center and
according to their expertise on specific policy areas. KPI 2
- The center translated and published an e-manual of
performance-based budgeting (produced by the Global
Program) in Spanish. The center is working on the publication
of a comparative study (Mexico and Colombia) that
analyzes the potentials and limitations of conditional cash
transfer implementation during natural disasters. KPI 1
Overall, the center implemented 39 activities, including
10 training sessions, 15 knowledge exchange (sharing)
seminars, 9 technical assistance activities, 2 evaluations,
publication of 2 knowledge resources, and 1 provision of
grant/scholarship. Of these, 11 were not a part of current
year work program. The cost of six training sessions was
covered by the sponsors or the participants.
The center’s activities involved more than 400 participants
from 14 Latin American countries, representing
government, civil society, and academic communities.
Forty-nine percent of the clients were from Latin American
countries other than Mexico.
Eighty-six percent of clients rated the quality of services
highly (4 or higher on a five-point scale); 80 percent of
clients rated the applicability of services highly (4 or
higher on a five-point scale).
Key Performance Indicators
KPI 1. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their work plans
the capacity to address a range of M&E topics and methodologies
(increase from baseline).
KPI 2. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their annual work
plan the capacity to offer capacity building through a variety of
modalities aimed at different capacity objectives (increase from
baseline).
26
3.2. Global Approach
CLEAR’s global approach comprises both developing and
implementing global knowledge and capacity and facilitating
the CLEAR centers network.
3.2.1. Global Knowledge and Capacity
CLEAR continued to refine and implement its global knowledge
and capacity-building programs in impact evaluation, performance-based
budgeting, rapid evaluations, and fundamentals
of evaluation.
In 2013, the hands-on technical impact evaluation workshops
were implemented in South Africa, China (in collaboration with
3IE), and Uganda. In addition, the performance-based budgeting
course was implemented in South Africa. These workshops
were designed to be codelivered with international experts,
who provided mentoring support to regionally based centers’
experts to lead the courses.
CLEAR also revised and updated a core set of knowledge and
workshop materials, “Fundamentals of M&E,” which are being
provided to the centers.
CLEAR continued to promote global knowledge exchange in
M&E capacity development through the Global Forum. The
Forums are designed to bring CLEAR members—centers, the
Board, and Secretariat—to discuss program, refine strategy,
and learn from each other. These fora have been organized
in Paris (June 2011) and Accra (January 2012). In 2013, the
forum took place in Tunis (February) and was hosted by the
African Development Bank.
Supporting and building professional M&E networks and CoPs
is a key priority for CLEAR. These networks and CoPs are also
important for establishing and developing demand for good
M&E practices. CLEAR has been at the center of many of these
efforts. In particular, it has been engaged in co-organizing
and contributing to RedLacME, the South Asian Evaluation
Conclave, the Benin Evaluation Association, and the South
African Evaluation Association. CLEAR has worked with these
associations to help define their objectives and agendas and
has participated in delivering workshops and seminars and
recommending international experts. CLEAR is also supporting
EvalPartners in various ways: it contributed to the publication
Evaluation and Civil Society and participated in the EvalPartners’
forum in Bangkok in December 2012 to outline how the
CLEAR centers can support the development of professional
networks at the regional level.
3.2.2. CLEAR Network Development
The program worked to create and refine the foundational
supports on which the CLEAR network rests and will grow.
This included:
• An updated theory of change
• An updated overall strategy for CLEAR strategy
• Tools and processes for developing capacity building programs.
3.2.3. New Center in Brazil—Expanding to the
Portuguese-Speaking World
In March 2013, the CLEAR Board decided to expand the program’s
footprint into Brazil, based on interest expressed from
the region and availability of funding from the Inter-American
Development Bank. As a result, a competitive selection process
was initiated in June 2013 and scheduled to conclude
in November 2013, with a center in Brazil expected to join in
early 2014. The CLEAR Brazil Center will be expected to partner
with institutions in Northeast Brazil and to collaborate closely
with the CLEAR Latin America Center in other regional activities
across Latin America. In addition, the new center could provide
some services to Portuguese-speaking countries in Africa.
27
4 | Looking Ahead
Although it is now well established, CLEAR is a complex program
requiring continuous refinements, adjustments, and solutions to
challenges as they emerge during implementation. The Board
commissioned a midterm evaluation, launched in late 2013,
which will generate fresh insights for strategy and implementation.
The evaluation will focus on issues that need to be
considered, such as future governance, strategy for expansion,
partnerships, and so on.
Annual reporting from the centers will also inform the grant
renewals processes. The future grants will cover a longer
period of time and the grant conditions will take into account
implementation issues encountered during the first year of full
grant implementation, such as delays in the appointment of
Regional Advisory Committees members and centers’ staffing.
Finally, the global peer-learning component will be enhanced,
beginning with the CLEAR Latin America Center organizing the
global forum, with a specific focus on business planning for
sustainability.
28
Results (Outcomes) Key Performance Indicators
Highest-Level Outcomes
to which CLEAR
Contributes
Stakeholders use evidence
in making decisions for
improved development
results
1. By 2018, 70 percent of strategic clients and stakeholders surveyed report increased
use of evidence in decision making
Higher-Level Outcomes to
which CLEAR Contributes
Strengthened contextspecific
M&E systems and
practices
2. By 2018, an external evaluation commissioned by the Board indicates that centers
have contributed to strengthening of M&E systems.
3. By 2018, an external evaluation commissioned by the Board indicates that at least
70 percent of CLEAR clients are using the knowledge, skills, or information they
gained to raise evaluation practice
CLEAR’S Outcomes
Regional Learning
• Enhanced enabling environment and strengthened demand
• Strengthened organizational capacity to produce and use evidence
• Critical mass of professional expertise developed
• Innovation in M&E
Measures to be determined by each center
Results (Outputs) Key Performance Indicators
Regional Learning
CLEAR Program-Level
Outputs
Strategically chosen
capacity building outputs
and activities of quality
implemented regionally
1. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their work plans the capacity to address
a range of M&E topics and methodologies (increase from baseline).
2. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their annual work plan the capacity to
offer capacity building through a variety of modalities aimed at different capacity
objectives (increase from baseline).
3. By their third year, at least 50 percent of each center’s clients are from outside of
the center’s home country.
4. By their 3rd year, at least 80 percent of the center’s clients score the quality of
service as a 4 or higher (on a five-point scale).
5. By 2018, an external evaluation indicates that the centers are functioning well with
respect to their strategic plans and objectives
CLEAR Program-Level
Outputs
Regional Centers
Established and Functional
1. By 2012, five centers selected and operational (original target was four).
2. By 2018, an external evaluation indicates that the centers are functioning well with
respect to their strategic plans and objectives
3. By 2018, centers’ percent of revenue-generating activities and programs increase
from baseline (targets will vary center to center)
Global Approach
Outcomes of Global
Learning
• CLEAR global
knowledge
• Peer-learning through
the network
1. By 2018, center directors and staff report that they have been able to apply
knowledge gained from other Regional Centers s through the CLEAR initiative
2. By 2018, the regional centers choose to continuing sharing knowledge and
expertise through a global network
3. By 2018, a survey of strategic clients and stakeholders indicate that at least 80 percent
recognize the CLEAR global brand as a source of excellence and innovation in M&E
APPENDIX 1: CLEAR’s Outcomes and Outputs1
1 Based on the updated theory of change.
29
APPENDIX 2: Overview of Work Program
Key Tasks,
Milestones, and
Deliverables
Period/
Completion
Date
Deliverables/Targets Status
(cumulative)
Status (July 2012-
June 2013)
REGIONAL APPROACH
Regional Centers
Selected
2010–12 Background studies
and consultations with
regional experts
Demand assessment
studies
Development of selection
criteria
Five centers selected
Five centers selected
by 2012
Brazil center
(additional center)
in the process of
being selected—to be
established early 2014
Regional Centers
Operational
2011–18 Annual work plans, annual
reviews, strategy updates
Ongoing/first
consolidated report
finalized in March
2013
Strategies to be
updated in the
next reporting
period. Guidance on
business planning for
sustainability being
designed for the
global forum in Mexico
(November 2013)
GLOBAL LEARNING
Global knowledge
and capacity
2011–18 One international
knowledge product/
capacity building
approach developed,
per year
Developed and
delivered
• Impact
evaluation (1)
• Performancebased

budgeting (2)
• Rapid evaluations
• Civil society
innovations/
approaches
• Rapid evaluations
course piloted
• M & E fundamentals
course developed
• Impact
evaluation (3)
• Performance-based
budgeting (1)
• South Asia with
Janasree—Gender
monitoring; South
Africa planning with
Interaction
2011–18 Global program
mentoring for
implementing knowledge/
capacity approaches, on
demand and based on
centers’ work programs
Mentoring and
facilitation with
experts provided to
all centers
Ongoing through the
capacity development
streams
30
Key Tasks,
Milestones, and
Deliverables
Period/
Completion
Date
Deliverables/Targets Status
(cumulative)
Status (July 2012-
June 2013)
Peer Learning 2011–18 Annual global forum
once per year, designed
in collaboration with the
sponsoring center.
2011/Paris
2012/Accra
2013/Tunis
2013/Mexico planned
for November
Network Support 2011–18 Quality assurance
guidelines, by end 2013
Operational manual, by
end 2013
Network development
activities—ongoing
Website, dissemination,
and communications—
ongoing
Ongoing
Taskforces on
governance (report)
Knowledge-sharing
through website
design (report)
Ongoing
GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT
Board Meetings
Secretariat Work
program
Approval of Work
programs
Reporting
Monitoring
Evaluation
2010–18
2010–18
2010–18
2010–18
2013–18
Twice/year
Annual
Quarterly; annual reports
Quarterly; twice-yearly
on site
Midterm by 2013 and final
by 2018
Ongoing
2012-2013 plan
prepared
Ongoing
Midterm evaluation
scope of work planned
(initial Terms of
Reference)
31
APPENDIX 3: Contributions to the Program, Budgets, and Expenditures
Table 1: Contributions to CLEAR, by Donor Agency
Funding Agency Receipts and Commitments
Asian Development Bank $450,000
African Development Bank $100,000
Australian Government - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade $1,042,240
Belgium $298,601
Department for International Development—UK $4,710,074
Inter-American Development Bank $900,000
Rockefeller Foundation $2,500,000
Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development $328,476
Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency $4,689,949
World Bank Institutional Development Fund (IDF)/Direct Cash to Center $995,790
World Bank IEG Cash Contribution* $1,200,000
Total $ 17,215,131
Total (non-World Bank) $ 15,019,341
Donor Funds Receipts Only $11,431,767
*Note: In addition, the World Bank/IEG contributes approximately $400,000/year.
Table 2: CLEAR Expenditures and Projections, by Fiscal Year and Component
Category
Total Planned
FY10-18
Expenditures
and
Commitments
FY10-13
Projected
FY14
(Year 3)
Projected
FY15
(Year 4)
Projected
FY16
(Year 5)
Projected
FY17
(Year 6)
Projected
FY18
(Year 7)
Regional: Grants
(Expenditures by
Center + Commitments)
$13,412,197 $5,063,197 $3,099,000 $1,250,000 $1,850,000 $2,150,000 --
Regional: Direct
Support, Demand
Assessment,
Selection
$919,408 $699,408 $220,000 -- -- -- --
Global $1,637,505 $327,505 $385,000 $320,000 $300,000 $230,000 $75,000
Governance and
Management $1,366,408 $136,408 $615,000 $80,000 $80,000 $80,000 $375,000
Administration
Fee $675,754 $325,754 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000
Total $18,011,272 $6,552,272 $4,389,000 $1,720,000 $2,300,000 $2,530,000 $520,000
Note: Includes the multi-donor trust fund and the institutional development fund (IDF).
32
Figure 1: Summary Projections Through FY18, by Center (%)
Latin America:
Lusophone, 3% Latin America:
Spanish Speaking, 10%
Anglophone
Africa, 35%
Francophone
Africa, 18%
East Asia, 6%
Pacific, 4%
South Asia, 22%
33
APPENDIX 4: CLEAR Phases and Timeline
Anglophone Africa (Mar–Dec 2010)
South Asia (Jun 2010–Jan 2011)
East Asia (Sep 2010)
Francophone Africa (Apr 2011–Jan 2012)
LAC (Apr 2011–Jan 2012)
Anglophone Africa (Dec 2011–Dec 2012)
South Asia (Sep 2011–Dec 2012)
East Asia (Oct 2012–Dec 2012)
Francophone Africa (Oct 2012–Dec 2012)
LAC (Oct 2012–Dec 2012)
Anglophone Africa (Dec 2011–Dec 2016)
South Asia (Sep 2011–Dec 2016)
East Asia (Oct 2012–Dec 2017)
Francophone Africa (Oct 2012–Dec 2017)
LAC (Oct 2012–Dec 2017)
Phase I:
Selection
Phase II:
Establishment
Phase III:
Consolidation
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
CLEAR Phases and Timeline
Program Established
(Jan 2010)
Anglophone Africa
CLEAR Center
South Asia
CLEAR Center
East Asia
CLEAR Center
Francophone Africa
CLEAR Center
Latin America
CLEAR Center
34
APPENDIX 5: Governance and Management
CLEAR’s governance and management structure comprises a
Board, the centers’ Regional Advisory Committees (RACs), and
the Secretariat. This arrangement is expected to evolve as the
program matures to meet new challenges and changing contexts.
Board
The Board is CLEAR’s main high-level decision-making body and
comprises member representatives from donors to the trust
fund managed by the World Bank Group. The Board is chaired
by the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank Group.
The Board invites participation in its meetings from non-Board
members (such as the centers’ RACs or experts and officials
from partner countries), as appropriate. The Board meets to
set goals and policy directions for the program, reviews and
approves work program and budgets, and commissions independent
evaluations of the CLEAR program.
Regional Advisory Committees
Governance at the level of the centers includes RACs established
by each center. RACs provide advice and guidance regarding
the centers’ strategies and work programs based on their
expertise and knowledge of regional issues with respect to
M&E. This governance structure ensures participant diversity,
country input, and stakeholder support.
Secretariat
The Secretariat, housed within the Independent Evaluation
Group, develops the overall strategy, supports the planning and
implementation of the work-plans of the centers, contributes
to the global program, executes the Board’s decisions, and
handles the administration of funds.
35
Board and Staff from Donor Agencies
Hans-Martin Boehmer
IEG, The World Bank (Chair)
Deborah Bowman
Australian Government - Department of Foreign Affairs
and Trade (DFAT)
Bruce Courtney
The World Bank
Cheryl Gray
Inter-American Development Bank
Suganya Hutaserani
Asian Development Bank
Jacqueline Lienard
Belgian Development Cooperation Agency
Mohamed Manai
African Development Bank (AfDB)
Nancy MacPherson
Rockefeller Foundation
Rakesh Nangia
African Development Bank (AfDB)
Lennart Peck
Swedish International Development
Co-operation Agency (SIDA)
Kellie Plummer
Australian Government - Department of Foreign Affairs
and Trade (DFAT)
David Rider Smith
UK Department for International Development (DfID)
Elizabeth Robin
UK Department for International Development (DfID)
Valerie Rossi
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
CLEAR Centers - Leadership
Anglophone Africa
Stephen Porter
Charles Amoatey (Ghana)
James Obuya Bagaka (Kenya)
Francophone Africa
El Hadji Gueye
Mady Koanda (Burkina Faso)
East Asia
Li Kouqing
Zhao Min
South Asia
John Floretta
Diva Dhar
Gemma Stevenson (Pakistan)
Latin America
Claudia Maldonado
Cristina Galindez
CLEAR Secretariat
Nidhi Khatrri, Head
Ximena Fernandez Ordonez
Naoko Hosaka
Maria Gabriela Padrino
Esperanza Sadiua
Arianne Wessal
Maurya West Meiers
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