CLEAR Annual Report 2013-2014

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Launched in 2010, CLEAR brings together selected and recognized academic institutions or think tanks with other organizations, such as foundations and multilateral and bilateral organizations, in a global knowledge and monitoring and evaluation (M&E) capacity development delivery partnership. The academic institutions and think tanks house the CLEAR Centers, while the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group hosts the program’s global hub. The program is envisaged to run through 2018. CLEAR is expected to promote replication of high-quality locally or regionally delivered capacity development services involving government agencies as well as civil society, and inspire such efforts globally.

The program’s goal is to be achieved by simultaneously:

• Stimulating demand for M&E capacity, through outreach and awareness building and developing and delivering innovative, responsive, contextually relevant, and cost-effective services

• Learning from, documenting, and sharing experiences and knowledge gained from the development and delivery process

Thus, CLEAR’s major benefit is expected to be building the capacity to build M&E capacity. This report summarizes the CLEAR Centers’ activities and achievements from July 2013 through June 2014. It also reflects on past experiences, summarizes the findings and lessons from the mid-term evaluation commissioned by CLEAR’s Board, and highlights the decisions for CLEAR’s future.

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Regional Centers for
Learning on Evaluation and Results
Evaluate. Learn. Decide.
www.theclearinitiative.org
@CLEARInitiative
Centers for Learning on
Evaluation and Results
Learning from the past and
looking to the Future
Annual Report July 2013–June 2014

Centers for Learning on
Evaluation and Results
Learning from the past and
looking to the Future
Annual Report July 2013–June 2014
Regional Centers for
Learning on Evaluation and Results
Evaluate. Learn. Decide.
www.theclearinitiative.org
@CLEARInitiative

i
Abbreviations ii
Foreword iii
Introduction 1
CLEAR’s Foundations 3
CLEAR’s Major Achievements July 2013–June 2014 7
Progress by Centers on Regional Learning 7
Anglophone Africa Center 10
South Asia Center 12
East Asia Center 15
Francophone Africa Center 17
Latin America Center 19
Cross-Regional Learning 21
Global Approach 21
The Way Forward 23
APPENDIXES 24
APPENDIX 1: CLEAR’s Outcomes and Outputs 24
APPENDIX 2: Overview of Program-Level Work Program 25
APPENDIX 3: Contributions to the Program, and Expenditures and Projections 27
APPENDIX 4: Governance and Management 29
Table of Contents
ii
2IE International Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering
ADB Asian Development Bank
AFDC Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center
AfrEA African Evaluation Association
CERP Center for Economic Research in Pakistan
CESAG Centre Africain d’Etudes Supérieures en Gestion in Senegal
CIDE Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas in Mexico
CLEAR Centers for Learning on Evaluation and Results
CONEVAL National Council for the Evaluation of Social Development Policy of Mexico
CoP Community of Practice
CSO Civil Society Organization
DPME Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation
GIMPA G hana Institute of Management and Public Administration
IEG Independent Evaluation Group
IFMR Institute for Financial Management and Research in India
J-PAL Jameel Poverty Action Lab in South Asia
KSG Kenya School of Government
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
NGO Non-Governmental Organization
SHIPDET Shanghai International Program in Development Evaluation Training
SNAI Shanghai National Accounting Institute
WITS University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg
Abbreviations
iii
Evaluate. Learn. Decide. This action-oriented motto, chosen by
the CLEAR centers and donors just now, to accompany them
throughout the coming four years, is an inspiring expression
of the learnings and insights gained over the past years. Why?
Let me start with the basics. The 2013–2014 period had continued
to be a highly productive year for CLEAR , with the five
centers promoting and building monitoring and evaluation
capacity. The centers reached more than 2,600 clients with 255
activities in more than 26 countries. Their work ranged from
contributing to important national dialogues about building
independent evaluation offices to supporting local monitoring
and evaluation networks and communities of practice. In
addition, CLEAR expanded its regional and linguistic reach
by selecting a new center to be based at the Getúlio Vargas
Foundation in Sao Paolo, Brazil, to begin operations in 2015.
This was also the period during which we reached “critical
mass”—with six centers selected, of whom four had come
to be well established, in countries with a vibrant discourse
on evaluation-based evidence, also actively reaching across
national boundaries. And so it was a good time for the CLEAR
Board to take the decision, in late 2013, to commission an
independent mid-term review of the program. The insights
from this review are now enabling us to learn from almost
four years of experience and to set the compass for CLEAR ’s
exciting new directions.
The evaluation indicated that CLEAR is a relevant initiative,
one that fits well with and is important for addressing the
international emphasis on strengthening country capacity for
evidence-based decisionmaking. Importantly, the evaluation
confirmed that CLEAR had achieved its mid-term targets.
Looking ahead, the report noted that CLEAR has “come of
age” and that the new realities of this evolving partnership
warranted a number of changes. Taking the recommendations
to heart, we decided that—in moving from its earlier “proof of
concept” stage into “start up” and “early maturity” mode—
CLEAR will position itself more and better as the learning and
innovation initiative that it needs to be to achieve broader
and lasting impact, beyond individual interventions at the
country level. At the same time, the nature of the partnership
has changed—becoming more collaborative, with the
centers’ leaders operating at equal footing with each other,
the global team and the CLEAR Board. This newly emerging
level playing field needs to be reflected in resetting the
initiative’s governance structure. Finally, and importantly, the
various changes following the evaluation are also triggering
some adjustments in the theory of change, associated targets,
and thus performance monitoring—on all of which we will
report more in next year’s report for the first time.
On a more personal note, I am myself grateful having been
able to join CLEAR as the new Chair of the Board at this time.
The reflection and renewal ahead, working in partnership with
the funding agencies and centers, are an honor and privilege
to participate in and support. Visiting India, China, South
Africa, Senegal, and Mexico, upon taking up my assignment,
I learned firsthand about how the program’s unique and
comprehensive approach to addressing all three dimensions
of capacity—individual, organizational, and institutional—is
being interpreted and addressed in innovative and situationspecifc
ways. A newcomer to the program, I am impressed
not only by what the centers have achieved—but also with
the broader potential of the program at large, building on
and driven by the aspirations and hard work of the colleagues
and partners engaged.
I thank the CLEAR centers’ leaders and staff for their initiative
and ingenuity, working in creative ways and with persistence
to build evaluation capacity. I also thank the CLEAR Board
members for their strategic guidance and superb support,
and the staff of our global team, for their dedication and
hard work in managing the program.
It is with great pride then that we share this Annual Report.
It should give our partners and their clients a lot to discuss
and reference—as well as anyone interested in or working in
the field of evaluation capacity. With the CLEAR program’s
uniqueness, this will be a great resource throughout the “Year
of Evaluation, 2015”!
Monika Weber-Fahr
Chair, CLEAR Board
Senior Manager
Foreword
iv
1
Launched in 2010, CLEAR brings together selected and
recognized academic institutions or think tanks with
other organizations, such as foundations and multilateral
and bilateral organizations, in a global knowledge and
monitoring and evaluation (M&E) capacity development
delivery partnership. The academic institutions and think
tanks house the CLEAR Centers, while the Independent
Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank Group hosts
the program’s global hub. The program is envisaged to
run through 2018.
CLEAR is expected to promote replication of high-quality
locally or regionally delivered capacity development services
involving government agencies as well as civil society,
and inspire such efforts globally. The program’s goal is to
be achieved by simultaneously:
• Stimulating demand for M&E capacity, through outreach
and awareness building and developing and
delivering innovative, responsive, contextually relevant,
and cost-effective services
• Learning from, documenting, and sharing experiences
and knowledge gained from the development and
delivery process
Thus, CLEAR’s major benefit is expected to be building
the capacity to build M&E capacity.
This report summarizes the CLEAR Centers’ activities and
achievements from July 2013 through June 2014. It also
reflects on past experiences, summarizes the findings and
lessons from the mid-term evaluation commissioned by
CLEAR’s Board, and highlights the decisions for CLEAR’s
future.
Introduction
2
3
CLEAR’s Vision and Mission
CLEAR’s original vision, “Development anchored in evidence,
learning, and mutual accountability,” was crafted
by its founding organizations. Reflecting upon experience
and the findings of the mid-term evaluation, members of
the CLEAR community reformulated the vision and mission
to articulate more directly and succinctly the core of
what CLEAR does.
The new vision as of October 1, 2014, is: Evaluate. Learn.
Decide.
CLEAR ’s mission is to improve policy and program decisions
through strengthening M&E systems and capacities. In carrying
out this mission, CLEAR innovates, tests, and learns
locally and regionally, and it shares and inspires globally.
Regional Centers
As of 2013, CLEAR is comprisd of five regional centers in
Africa, Asia, and Latin America (Figure 1):
• The CLEAR Anglophone Africa Center—University
of Witwatersrand in South Africa, with two partners:
the Ghana Institute of Management and Public and
Administration and the Kenya School of Government
• The CLEAR South Asia Center—Jameel Poverty Action
Lab South Asia at the Institute for Financial Management
and Research in India with partner, Center for
Economic Research in Pakistan
• The CLEAR East Asia Center—Asia-Pacific Finance
and Development Center, based at the Shanghai
National Audit Institute in China
• The CLEAR Francophone Africa Center—Centre
African d’Etudes Superieures en Gestion in Senegal,
with partner 2ie-International Institute for Water and
Environmental Engineering in Burkina Faso
• The CLEAR Latin America Center—Centro de Investigación
y Docencia Económicas in Mexico
In November 2013, CLEAR completed the competitive
selection process for a new center to serve Brazil and
Lusophone Africa, to be based at the Getúlio Vargas
Foundation in Brazil. The center is expected to start
operations in early 2015. The center will partner with
institutions in Northeast Brazil and collaborate with the
CLEAR Latin America Center in other regional activities
across Latin America.
Theory of Change and Key
Performance Indicators
CLEAR’s overall program strategy is based on a dynamic
learning-by-doing model. It comprises integrating regional
learning and on-the-ground implementation with a global
approach for generating public goods and knowledge
in M&E. The idea is for the regional centers to stimulate
demand for M&E and respond with a strategically selected
set of activities within their own regions to support the
CLEAR outcomes.
CLEAR’s Foundations
4
Figure 1. CLEAR Centers
Anglophone Africa
University of Witwatersrand Johannesburg (WITS), South Africa
• Kenya School of Government (KSG)*
• Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA)*
Francophone Africa
Centre Africain d’Etudes Supérieures en Gestion (CESAG), Senegal
• International Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering (2IE),
Burkino Faso*
East Asia
Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC), China
South Asia
Jameel Poverty Action Lab South Asia (J-PAL) at the Institute for Financial
Management (IFMR), India
• Centre for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP)*
Latin America
Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas A.C. (CIDE), Mexico
*Affiliate center
5
The global program approach intends to help strengthen
the centers by enabling their participation in the CLEAR
network and learning from M&E experiences in their own
regions and beyond. CLEAR’s Theory of Change (Figure
2) and Key Performance Indicators (Appendix 1) were
intended to reflect this strategy and are used for the
purposes of this report.
Reflecting on experience and incorporating the mid-term
evaluation findings and recommendations, however,
the CLEAR community is crafting an updated Theory of
Change and associated Key Performance Indicators, to
be adopted by July 2015. Both will be better aligned with
what CLEAR does and its future directions.
Program Components
Centers for Regional Learning
Regional learning is implemented by the institutions that
the CLEAR program competitively selected and supports
to house the CLEAR centers. The centers focus on the
“evaluation gap” at regional and local levels and aim to
provide applied, practical, innovative, and cost-effective
M&E capacity building services in the regions in which they
are based. They also work to generate knowledge in M&E
capacity building. Working with key clients and influential
stakeholders, the centers intend to contribute to:
• Improved enabling environments and demand for M&E
• Strengthened capacity to produce and use evidence
• Expanded professional expertise in regions
• Innovations in M&E
The program concurrently supports the selected centers’
leadership, technical, managerial, and administrative
capacities for long-term sustainability. The aim is for
the centers to become financially self-sustainable in the
long-term, without CLEAR grant support.
Global Approach
CLEAR anchors the overall program with its global
approach, and is intended to: generate and share internationally
benchmarked knowledge and capacity development
in M&E; support peer learning among the regional
centers; and build international brand recognition.
• Global Knowledge and Capacity. One of CLEAR ’s key
activities is to develop, aggregate, and share global
knowledge and expertise to strengthen the centers’
technical and professional capacity. The CLEAR Global
Forum facilitates peer learning and knowledge exchange
on M&E knowledge and approaches among members
and across regions. The program also provides support
to M&E communities of practice (CoPs).
• Network Support. Through this component, CLEAR
provides implementation guidance to the centers and
undertakes work that benefits the CLEAR network.
Going forward, both components will be strengthened
to include a greater focus on cross-regional collaboration
and broader knowledge sharing. Appendix 2 provides an
overview of the program-level work accomplished under
regional learning and global approach components.
Through FY14, approximately 90% of the CLEAR Trust
Fund budget was devoted to regional learning and 5%
to the global approach. The remaining 5% was used for
program governance and management, including regular
monitoring and reporting. In addition, the World Bank
Group used its administrative budget and staff time to
support CLEAR . Appendix 3 provides details on contributions
to the program, and expenditures and projections.
6
CLEAR Theory of Change 2013
(Revisions forthcoming)
Highest level outcomes
Stakeholders use evidence in making decisions for improved development results
Higher level outcomes
Strengthened monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems and practices
CLEAR’s outcomes
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened
capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded
professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
Strategically chosen capacity building outputs and activities
Establishing CLEAR and how CLEAR works
Regional knowledge and innovations enhance global learning
Promotes diversity in M&E
methods and approaches that
are context appropriate
CLEAR network
and centers are
established and
performing
CLEAR recognized
as a leader in
advancing M&E
regionally and globally
Global knowledge strengthens centers and regional approach
Resources underpinning CLEAR
Regional Learning
Responds to need and demand
Enhances demand
Global Approach
Donor funds and
center revenues
Advice and expert
support
Strategic
partnerships
Governance and
management
Stakeholders
Clients
• Government
• Civil society
• Non-profit
• Private sector
• Academia
• Philanthropy
• Donors
Leadership Development
Mentoring
Advocacy
Grants, Competitions,
and Awards
Knowledge Resources
Knowledge Sharing
Training
Collaboration with M&E Networks,
Communities of Practice
Technical Assistance,
Advisory
Diagnostics
Evaluations, Assessments
Other
Vision
Evaluate. Learn. Decide.
Mission
We are a global team. We aim to improve policy decisions through
strengthening monitoring and evaluation systems and capacities. We
innovate, test, and learn locally and regionally. We share and inspire globally.
Revised June 2013
Regional Centers for
Learning on Evaluation and Results
Figure 2. CLEAR Theory of Change
7
Progress by Centers on
Regional Learning
All centers delivered their annual work programs in their
regions contributing to four outcome areas, represented
in the following pages by the corresponding icon:
Improved enabling environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened capacity to produce
and use evidence
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
Innovations in M&E
The centers contribute to the same set of outcome areas,
but to different degrees. Each center operates in its own
environment and therefore develops its own specific
strategies based on the opportunities the environment
presents, its own technical capacities, and the amount of
financial resources available. Table 1 provides an overview
of the operating context and main strategy elements for
each center.
Currently, CLEAR is active in the eight countries where
the centers and their partners are located, but has also
served across 26 countries and enrolled participants for its
training and knowledge exchange programs from many
more. From July 2013 to June 2014, the centers delivered
255 activities and reached more than 2,600 participants
(Figures 3 and 4).
CLEAR’s Major Achievements July 2013–June 2014
2915199+4217131
Figure 3. Types of activities
18%
More than 2,600 from government,
civil society groups/NGOs, and academia
Figure 4. Total participants
n Training
n Knowledge sharing
n Technical assistance/advisory services
n Knowledge resources
n Collaboration with M&E communities
of practice
n Diagnostics
n Center staff development
n Evaluation/assessment/
research
n Scholarships/grants/
competitions
n Advocacy
31%
15%
16%
11%
5%
8
Operations Host Institution Regional Context Highlights of FY14 Strategy
ANGLOPHONE AFRICA CENTER
Operational
May 2011
Grant amount
USD $3,883,000
University of
Witwatersrand
(WITS), South
Africa
Affiliate Centers:
• Ghana Institute
of Management
and Public and
Administration
(GIMPA)
• Kenya School
of Government
(KSG)
During the past five years,
important advancements have
been made in M&E systems
in a number of countries in
Africa. South Africa started
consolidating its M&E system
and other countries in the
region, such as Uganda, Ghana,
and Kenya, have made progress
in establishing theirs.
The Department of Performance
Monitoring and Evaluation
(DPME) in the South African
Presidency, the center’s primary
external partner, has been a
key driver for M&E both in the
country and in the region. It has
requested services related to
M&E diagnostics, strategies,
and development of skills for
government employees. It has
also been active in sharing
knowledge and experiences with
other countries.
Demand for advice on M&E
systems has grown, but
evaluation capacity remains
quite low across most African
countries.
• Expanded the supply of professional
capacity building on M&E in the region
through a range of interventions, including
M&E graduate and short-course programs
and individual training.
• Supported DPME through policy, tools,
frameworks, and guidance and supported
their engagement in Africa through country
M&E diagnostics.
• Supported several countries’ professional
development in M&E through technical
assistance to knowledge networks and
national evaluation associations (such as
South African Monitoring and Evaluation
Association and African Evaluation
Association).
• Developed methodologies and tools in
new areas of evaluation—evaluation of
impact investing, rapid impact evaluation,
evaluative thinking, etc.
SOUTH ASIA CENTER
Operational
April 2011
Grant amount
USD $1,913,000
Jameel Poverty
Action Lab (J-PAL)
at the Institute
for Financial
Management and
Research (IFMR),
India
Affiliate Center:
• Centre for
Economic
Research
(CERP), Pakistan
The government of India has
shown varied amounts of interest
in using evidence or information
from M&E to inform decisionmaking.
M&E activities at the
state or provincial level are
mostly undertaken in response
to requirements specified by the
central government or to meet
the requirements of external
donors.
Demand is nascent in other
countries but growing gradually.
• Made progress in becoming a central
node in the larger M&E community that
empowers the entire evaluation community
in South Asia and creates a demand for
evidence for use in decisionmaking.
• Honed the center’s outreach and delivery
strategy, focusing on three broad areas in
which there is a high need and demand in
South Asia: data collection, measurement,
and indicator development; impact
evaluation; and development of M&E
systems.
• Worked on strengthening state-level
evaluation systems in India through a
combination of workshops and technical
advisory services.
• Continued to deliver training and
workshops to government, civil society, and
research organizations based on need and
demand.
Table 1. Regional contexts and strategies, by center
9
Operations Host Institution Regional Context Highlights of FY14 Strategy
EAST ASIA CENTER
Operational
July 2012
Grant amount
USD $350,000
Asia-Pacific
Finance and
Development
Centre (AFDC),
China, based at
the Shanghai
National Audit
Institute (SNAI)
There is a huge effort
in government financial
bureaus and departments
in understanding M&E and
using evaluations for program
improvement. Other East Asian
countries have a similar interest
in strengthening their officials’
knowledge about evaluation.
• Implemented a series of training programs
and research, and developed a newsletter
on evaluation.
• Reached out to government officials at
the local level, through specially organized
courses and workshops on M&E.
• Contributed to high-level knowledge
sharing/advocacy on evaluation practice
to raise awareness on the importance of
evaluation.
• Integrated M&E within the learning
curriculum for other fields, such as
accounting, to embed in government
practice.
francophone CENTER
Operational
December 2012
Grant amount
USD $1,264,000
Centre Africain
d’Etudes
Superieures en
Gestion (CESAG),
Senegal
Affiliate Center:
• International
Institute for
Water and
Environmental
Engineering
(2IE)
While there is growing demand
for M&E in Francophone Africa
due to an increased focus
on results toward millennium
development goals or poverty
reduction strategy objectives,
institutional arrangements
in favor of evidence-based
decisionmaking are still lacking.
Moreover, political instability
in the region could lead to the
disruption of commitments
made by policymakers. There is
also a simultaneous constraint
in the supply and quality of
evaluation expertise.
• Identified and engaged with champions in
several governments in the region who are
prioritizing the M&E agenda as national
policy.
• Started to provide a package of
services—M&E demand and supply
assessments, customized trainings, and
tailored policy advice—to strategically
selected governments to strengthen their
institutional arrangements.
• Started to update the center’s strategy plan,
with a focus on diversifying products and
services, especially advocacy and advisory/
knowledge services for a greater influence
at the policy level.
• Improved the training component by
partnering with institutions that could bring
additional technical expertise.
Spanish -speaking latin america CENTER
Operational
June 2012
Grant amount
USD $695,000
Centro de
Investigación
y Docencia
Económicas
(CIDE), Mexico
Although most Latin American
countries have incorporated
M&E practices in their legal
frameworks, there are persistent
differences in their degree of
sophistication, the quality of
their evaluative activities, and
their methods and systems. The
center plays a critical role in
regional client capacity building
by matching this demand
heterogeneity with a supplydriven
portfolio of services.
• Identified specific policy areas, countries,
and partners to focus efforts and resources.
• Engaged with key actors in the region’s lowincome
countries to identify potential entry
points and collaboration opportunities.
• Continued to deliver regional client capacity
building on a variety of topics, such as
performance-based management, local
government M&E systems, participatory
M&E, M&E in public security, and migration
and governance.
• Used technical assistance activities to
continue collaboration after projects end.
10
n Training
n Knowledge sharing
n Technical assistance/advisory services
n Knowledge resources
n Collaboration with M&E communities of
practice
n Advocacy
n Evaluation/assessment/research
Anglophone Africa Center
Selected in October 2010 and operational since May 2011, the center is hosted at the University of
Witwatersrand, and partners with the Kenya School of Government (KSG) and the Ghana Institute of
Management and Public Administration (GIMPA). A summary of the center’s activities, highlights of
the center’s achievements and how they contributed to outcome areas, and challenges faced during
FY14 follow below.
Showcasing New Thinking in Evaluation with Four NGO Case Studies
CLEAR Anglophone Africa collaborated with CSO s/NGO s through a range of knowledge
sharing and training events. This collaboration was complemented by a joint publication,
“Embracing Evaluative Thinking for Better Outcomes: Four NGO Case Studies.” The
publication was shared at a Sub-Saharan Africa practitioner workshop held in Accra,
Ghana in December 2013 and co-sponsored by the African Evaluation Association,
CLEAR Anglophone Africa, and InterAction. It was also discussed at the African Evaluation
Association in Cameroon in March 2014.
The case studies show how different evaluative thinking processes are emerging across
NGOs in Africa and what this may mean for different contexts and evaluation situations.
Publishing these case studies contributed to the practice and learning of evaluation globally.
Type and Number of Activities
CLEAR Anglophone Africa implemented 21 activities, with 387 total participants. The center continued its operations
although the number of activities declined in FY14. This decline is due to bundling a mix of activities for a specific purpose
and also because of delays in finalizing a work program and obtaining grant funding. This was due to changes in
center and university leadership, as discussed in the Challenges section that follows. The overall quality of the center’s
courses scored well at 4.28 on a five-point scale.
432012+9646B
FY13
45 Total
Activities
23
3
5
9
1010201050+A
FY14
11
2
2
2
4
21 Total
Activities
Highlights of Achievements
Innovations in M&E
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
2
2
1
contributions to
outcome aReas:
11
Strengthening M&E Leadership with the South African Presidency
CLEAR Anglophone Africa strengthened its ongoing relationship with the
Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME ) by providing
in-service workshops to assist with the design of evaluations in the national
evaluation plan. It supported the DPME in key M&E capacity development initiatives
in consolidating a suite of courses for DPME evaluation managers that are now
widely circulated within the public service. The center also helped develop these
courses into a Certificate in Evaluation for public sector managers offered at the
WITS School of Governance.
In addition, the center worked with DPME in developing evaluation standards and
competencies; assisting in the development of evaluation guidance documents;
participating in evaluation steering and technical committees, working groups and
national evaluation panels; and supporting a liaison with national and government
M&E forums, the Parliament, and higher education institutions.
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
Developing a Critical Mass of M&E Professionals Across Southern Africa
CLEAR Anglophone Africa continued its collaboration with other areas of the WITS School of Governance in designing and
delivering a Masters Diploma in M&E as well as specialized M&E sections in the School’s Masters of Management course.
The center contributes to an ever-growing pool of M&E graduate students who come to WITS from across Southern Africa.
In addition to the school’s formal programs, the center conducted two impact evaluation courses with clients from across
the continent, in collaboration with 3ie (International Initiative for Impact Evaluation).
Challenges
Staff changes: The center’s director moved to a new job in
February 2014, necessitating the appointment of an interim
director. The interim director and program management
officer developed an action plan to ensure operational
continuity. The action plan included steps to stabilize the
financial and operational systems, speed up approval of
the new grant and retrospective financing, and recruit a
new director and additional staff.
Hiatus in grant funding: The center’s first tranche of funding
ended in May 2013. Due to the transition in leadership,
both at the center and at the university chancellor’s office,
the center experienced difficulties completing the new
contributions to outcome aRea:
project document and fully complying with administrative
requirements to process a second grant. The center therefore
had limited funds from May 2013 to when the second
tranche was provided in May 2014. During this period ,the
World Bank provided USD $100,000 in retroactive financing
and an additional USD $100,000 in contracts that assisted
in ensuring completion of existing commitments to clients.
However, there was still a funding gap that hampered the
recruitment of replacement staff, essential investments
in operations, and the commissioning of new program
activities. However, the new grant was signed in May 2014,
bringing the center back into full operation.
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
contributions to outcome aReas:
12
Advising USAID/India on How to Measure the Impact of Interventions
CLEAR South Asia provided advisory services to USAID /India to help them assess the potential evaluability of their 2013–2017
Country Development Corporate Strategy portfolio. The four-month engagement aimed to build institutional capacity for
commissioning impact evaluations and led to the production of a variety of processes and M&E tools.
For example, CLEAR South Asia worked with USAID/India’s senior management and technical teams to develop a toolkit
on impact evaluation. This toolkit lays down a process for USAID/India staff to assess which activities within their portfolio
would be both strategic and feasible to evaluate formally.
CLEAR South Asia also provided advisory services to the Centre for Research and Experiments for Action and Policy,
Government of Haryana, to carry out more systematic research and M&E of ongoing government programs.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
South Asia Center
The center at the Jameel Poverty Action Lab South Asia at the Institute for Financial Management and Research
(IFMR ) in India was selected in December 2010, together with its partner, the Center for Economic Research in
Pakistan (CERP ) and became operational in April 2011. Asummary of the center’s activities, highlights of the
center’s achievements and how they contributed to outcome areas, and challenges faced during FY14
follow below.
n Training
n Knowledge sharing
n Technical assistance/advisory services
n Knowledge resources
n Collaboration with M&E communities of
practice
n Diagnostics
n Center staff development
n Evaluation/assessment/research
Type and Number of Activities
CLEAR South Asia delivered 113 activities, with 1,074 total participants (63% were non-Indian and 40% were female).
The center delivered all of its planned activities; it exceeded its target by 19 events and witnessed a dramatic
increase in demand for capacity building services. The general quality of the center’s events scored well at 4.01 on a
five-point scale.
3299+292235B
FY13
51 Total
Activities
16
18
4
5
5
21+2613241114A
FY14
27
12 25
16
29
113 Total
Activities
3
Highlights of Achievements
contributions to outcome aReas:
13
Helping to Establish the First Statewide M&E System in Tamil Nadu
CLEAR South Asia is helping the government of Tamil Nadu to implement the
first-ever comprehensive, statewide, results-based M&E system. The center
provides technical advice and training to help the government build their
capacity to collect, analyze, and understand data.
As part of the process, the center is conducting a needs assessment and diagnostic
exercise to provide a better understanding of the current situation, build capacity
in the government, and devise an action plan to build the entire M&E system.
The center’s previous work in helping CSOs and government agencies develop
monitoring and data systems, as well as mentoring provided by IEG of the World
Bank on country M&E systems and diagnostics, led to this ongoing engagement.
Outcomes from this engagement will help inform M&E systems building in other
state-level governments in South Asia.
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence Innovations in M&E
Building a Pipeline of Indian Civil Servants with M&E Expertise
The center maintained its strong partnership with the Indian civil services, through both the Indian Economic Service and
Indian Administrative Service. For the second year, CLEAR South Asia provided a two-week training course for the Indian
Economic Service, equipping incoming officers with the skills to conduct and manage evaluations, as well as use evaluations
for decisionmaking.
The center also conducted a one-week course for Indian Economic Service mid-level officers and a 12-week course for Indian
Administrative Service entry-level officers; the two engagements will continue in the upcoming financial year. Through these
annual courses, CLEAR South Asia is working to institutionalize M&E training in the civil services, which can help to build the
M&E skills of civil servants, as well as an enabling environment for M&E within the government.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
contributions to outcome aReas:
contributions to outcome aReas:
14
Challenges
Increasing demand for capacity building services: The
center has access to a limited pool of M&E experts in South
Asia to deal with the increased demand. It is conducting
an extensive recruitment process to expand its staff as well
as working to expand and formalize its affiliate network of
partners with advice from its Regional Advisory Committee.
Political/country risk: There is volatility in Pakistan and
to a lesser extent in Bangladesh, and elections in India
led to the turnover of key government officials as well as
the restructuring of government offices. To mitigate the
risks, the center is maintaining close relationships with
Initiating Four Roundtable Discussions on Measuring Gender Outcomes
CLEAR South Asia has pioneered an M&E roundtable
series to serve as a common forum for M&E professionals,
policymakers, CSOs, and donors. In collaboration with the
Community of Evaluators and UN Women, the center kicked
off this year’s series of four roundtable discussions on the
topic of “Gender, Evaluation and Empowerment.”
Women’s empowerment can lead to economic growth,
better health outcomes, reduction of poverty, and increased
educational attainment. However, few mainstream tools
or indicators accurately measure women’s empowerment
outcomes. The roundtables provided a forum for key gender
and M&E experts in South Asia to share experiences in
defining and measuring gender outcomes and to provide
insights into new and innovative gender measures, which
can be applied within South Asia and globally.
The roundtables reached more than 600 individuals,
of which 143 were in-person and the rest by webcast.
Innovations in M&E
government at both the national and state levels, as well
as developing multi-pronged strategies of engagement.
Financial sustainability risks: Due to the mixed willingness-to-pay
for capacity building services, the center
experienced risks to financial sustainability. In response,
the center is working to refine its revenue generation
model. It is developing longer-term partnerships with
key stakeholders who have a high demand for evaluation
capacity building. To diversify its funding portfolio it is also
experimenting with different models of fee-for-service,
in-kind support, and cost recovery.
60201010+B
Expanded professional
expertise in regions contributions to outcome aReas:
15
East Asia Center
The center at Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC) at Shanghai National Accounting
Institute (SNAI ) in China was included in the CLEAR program because of its ongoing engagement since
2007 with the IEG of the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) on evaluation capacity
building in East Asia. The center became operational in July 2012. A summary of the center’s activities,
highlights of the center’s achievements and how they contributed to outcome areas, and challenges
faced during FY14 follow below.
Informing Provincial Finance Bureaus on Ways to Evaluate Performance
CLEAR East Asia collaborated with the Shanghai Finance Bureau to publish a newsletter about good practices in, and reform
of, performance evaluation of fiscal budgets. They distributed the newsletter to all the provincial finance bureaus across
China as well as some newly launched departments in charge of performance evaluation. This newsletter continues the
collaboration with Henan province last year.
The center will continue to collaborate with different finance bureaus to introduce their specific approaches to performance
evaluation. The newsletter is also a good way to keep in contact with alumni from evaluation trainings.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Type and Number of Activities
CLEAR East Asia implemented 13 activities, with 477 total participants (39% were non-Chinese and 31% were female).
n Training
n Knowledge sharing
n Technical assistance/advisory services
n Center staff development 15+65515A
n Evaluation/assessment/research
FY14
1
2
8
2
13 Total
Activities 60
FY13
201010+B 12 Total
Activities
8
1
2 1
Highlights of Achievements
Sponsoring the First Workshop in M&E for Cambodian Officials
CLEAR East Asia co-sponsored the workshop, “Performance Based Evaluation, Budgeting and Fiscal Management,”
co-organized by the Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center, Ministry of Finance, China, and Economy and Finance
Institute in Cambodia. This is the third training for Cambodian officials to share their experiences in fiscal reform and
development with the Chinese government, and the first one that addressed the field of M&E. The course was delivered in
Chinese and interpreted into Khmer. The workshop attracted a total of 28 participants.
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
contributions to outcome aReas:
contributions to outcome aReas:
16
Enabling the Exchange of Best Practices Between the International M&E
Community and Chinese Local Provinces
CLEAR East Asia continues to train cadres of public officials in M&E
using a teaching modality that gives equal importance to experts’
teaching, peer learning, and experience sharing between different
countries. The CLEAR -Shanghai International Program in Development
Evaluation Training (SHIPDET ) special topic courses on results-based
planning, budgeting, and M&E combined top-level international
expertise, exchange with international practitioners, and sharing of
good local practices. The training had a total of 172 participants.
Local Chinese government officials appreciate this exposure at the
grassroots level, and international participants gain knowledge of
practices used by Chinese local finance bureaus. The training enabled unique interactions between international participants,
participants from central Asia, and line ministries of China, as well as local departments/bureaus of Chinese provinces.
The center is seizing these opportunities to nurture its own expertise to teach increasing parts of the international courses in
the future, while at the same time enhancing its capacity to continuously improve its offerings at the provincial levels in China.
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
Challenges
Increasing demand for M&E services: In late CY14, the
Chinese government will upgrade AFD C, the host institute
of CLEAR East Asia, to be the Asia-Pacific Finance and
Development Institute. CLEAR East Asia is planning to
integrate M&E courses into its masters program curriculum
for government officials from the region.
Internal capacity: The center wants to conduct about
50 percent of the activities with its own professional staff
rather than rely on international experts, so it is working on
strengthening its internal technical capacity. The center will
also continue to support the capacity building of Chinese
certified accountants, which started in 2012 in collaboration
Customizing e-Learning Courses for Chinese Government Officials
CLEAR East Asia used distance learning and e-learning methods to expand the impact of development evaluation in China.
By localizing the international M&E courses, the center staff developed a course for the Chinese performance-based
budgeting system and then put the course onto SNAI’s e-learning platform. The Ministry of Finance of China selected the
course as one of the compulsory courses for training government officials in finance bureaus as well as all of the government’s
evaluation entities.
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
with SNAI , since accountants can be an important force in
demanding and conducting evaluations in China.
Capacity building for low-income countries: The center,
jointly with AD B, will offer special topic courses to government
officials from low-income countries in the region, such
as Cambodia, Lao PDR , Myanmar, and Vietnam. Reaching
these participants is a challenge. The center will continue to
hold activities in different places in China, especially local
provinces. The center is also extending its full program to
participants from the Pacific Islands through scholarships,
and participants from Greater Mekong Subregion and
Central Asia Regional Economic Cooperation countries
through financial support by ADB.
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
contributions to outcome aReas:
contributions to outcome aReas:
17
Francophone Africa Center
The Centre African d’Etudes Superieures en Gestion (CESAG) was selected as a CLEAR Francophone
Center in October 2011. The center has been operational since December 2012. A summary of the
center’s activities, highlights of the center’s achievements and how they contributed to outcome areas,
and challenges faced during FY14 follow below.
Type and Number of Activities
CLEAR Francophone Africa implemented 23 activities, with 166 total participants (63% were non-Senegalese and 25%
were female). The general quality of the center’s events scored well at 4.38 on a five-point scale.
n Training
n Knowledge sharing
n Technical assistance/advisory services
n Collaboration with M&E communities of
practice
n Diagnostics
n Center staff development 25+381815
n Evaluation/assessment/research
4A
FY14
4
3 6
9
23 Total 80
Activities
1010+B
FY13
6 Total
Activities
4
1
1 1
Highlights of Achievements
Supporting the Creation of a National Evaluation Policy in Togo with an
M&E Training and Assessment
The center is increasingly working more strategically with governments of several countries in the region who are prioritizing
M&E agenda as national policy. To engage in a meaningful way with a client country’s M&E, the center has taken a “package”
approach instead of implementing ad-hoc activities.
To support a nascent initiative in creating evaluation policy in Togo, the center held a weeklong basic M&E training in Togo.
In addition to the training, the center launched an assessment of M&E supply and demand in Togo with the ministry of
forecasting and evaluation of public policies of Togo. It established a technical steering committee comprised of staff from
the ministry in charge of evaluation and other development actors involved in the process to ensure better monitoring and
ownership of results. After the completion of the assessment, the center is planning to assist Togo in designing a mediumterm
work program to structure their technical assistance.
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E contributions to outcome aReas:
18
Implementing an Innovative Selection Process for M&E Trainings
This past year, CLEAR Francophone Africa established an innovative participant selection process for its M&E trainings. The
center developed an application assessment approach that systematically rates participant applicants based on their prior
knowledge, the likelihood that their organization will give them space to deploy their new skills, and the relevance of M&E
to their organization. This creates a systematic approach to selecting participants.
The team involves others across the host organization in CESAG in the selection, as a means to broaden the engagement
with their work.
Innovations in M&E
Challenges
Technical and resource constraints: Constraints have
arisen due to increasing demand for targeted support
by partners and clients. Under a new coordinator since,
the center is trying to strengthen its technical expertise
by hiring full-time and short-term consultants on specific
topics, sending CESAG staff to trainings on topics related
to the center’s work, and establishing strategic partnerships
with knowledgeable experts.
Cumbersome internal procedures: CESAG ’s administrative
and financial management system often results
in delays to the implementation of the center’s activities.
263820664+B
However, CESAG is transforming itself into a business
school, which indicates it may be moving toward a culture
focused on results. It is hoped that this transformation will
reform internal processes to the benefit of CLEAR.
Competing priorities: The center has often had parallel
requests that have led to additional unplanned work.
The center recognizes that a balance is needed and will
redouble its attention to assess which actions are most
relevant to take.
Sparking Demand for National and Local M&E Systems in Senegal
CLEAR Francophone Africa is developing champions and sparking demand for M&E
systems in Senegal. The center has worked closely with the unit in charge of developing
the national M&E System in Senegal, the Office of Organizations and Methods (BOM)
in the Presidency, to increase their interest and work in evidence-based policymaking.
The participation of BOM’s head in the CLEAR Global Forum in Mexico City gave them
a glimpse of what M&E systems can do for national policymaking in other regions
and showed the possibilities and benefits of a partnership with CLEAR for mobilizing
demand locally. As a follow-up, and based on the findings of the assessment of the M&E
supply and demand the center conducted in Senegal, BOM requested, and the center
provided, a four-day customized training on public policy evaluations for their staff.
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
contributions to outcome aRea:
contributions to outcome aReas:
19
Latin America Center
The CLEAR Latin America center at the Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas (CIDE ) in
Mexico was selected in December 2011 and officially launched by Mexico’s President Felipe Caldreron
in June 2012. A summary of the center’s activities, highlights of the center’s achievements and how they
contributed to outcome areas, and challenges faced during FY14 follow below.
Promoting Peer Support in M&E Across Eight Countries in an
International South-South Knowledge Exchange
CLEAR Latin America organized an international South-South exchange aimed at
finding ways to allow countries to support each other in building their M&E systems.
The exchange provided a neutral and open format for participants to share experiences
and knowledge on the use of evidence to improve public policies and programs.
The exchange brought together members of the executive, the Parliament and
technical experts from eight developing countries interested in strengthening their
M&E systems: Benin, Colombia, Ghana, India, Mexico, Peru, South Africa, and
Uganda. This format allowed countries to learn from each other and set up continuous
collaboration to identify common problems and support each other’s work.
CLEAR Latin America has taken advantage of regional networks not only to meet with key actors but also to disseminate the
center’s activities and offer trainings.
Improved enabling
environments and
demand for M&E
Type and Number of Activities
CLEAR Latin America implemented 85 activities, with 586 total participants (50% were non-Mexican and 44% were
female). The general quality of the center’s events scored well at 4.33 on a five-point scale.
n Training
n Knowledge sharing
n Technical assistance/advisory services
n Knowledge resources
n Collaboration with M&E communities of
practice
n Center staff development
n Evaluation/assessment/research
n Scholarships/grants/competitions
n Advocacy
263820664+B
FY13
39 Total
Activities
10
1
9 2
15
2
26191515772+9A
FY14
9
22
13
15
85 Total
Activities
13
6
Highlights of Achievements
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
6
contributions to outcome aReas:
20
Challenges
Regional diversity: Given the wide differences in the development
and consolidation of M&E systems in the region,
it is a challenge to design interventions and knowledge
products that can meet diverse client needs. The center
is continuing efforts to identify strategic demand areas
and partner with local institutions to refine its activities
and meet diverse needs.
Strengthening the M&E Management of National and State Governments
CLEAR Latin America provided technical assistance to strengthen the institutional and procedural infrastructures in M&E and
project management for the governments of Argentina and El Salvador; several agencies of the Mexican public administration;
and the state governments of Guanajuato, Distrito Federal, and Jalisco. Jalisco’s state government was supported through the
center’s participation in their Technical Council for Evaluation of Public Policy. The latter allowed the center to be involved in
the promotion of two electronic platforms that have been recognized nationally for their innovative approach. The platforms
monitor Jalisco’s government programs and development indicators.
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
Bolstering Staff Capacity and Processes to Better Build Partnerships
Because training has proven to be an effective entry point in consolidating partnerships with governments in the region,
CLEAR Latin America spent significant time building its internal capacity. The staff received training on a variety of topics,
including evaluation basics, logic framework methodology, cost-benefit analysis, database management, and geographic
information systems applied to social sciences. Introductory courses have been established to bring new staff members up
to speed on the most relevant internal processes. As part of the ongoing training program, two staff members participated
in the International Program for Development Evaluation Training 2014 core course.
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
Sustainability for activities: Long-term sustainability of
M&E and performance management systems varies in the
region, especially in low-income countries where the center
is seeking to strengthen its presence. The center’s strategy
is to design clustered activities instead of isolated efforts,
and to include most of the Central American countries
in training projects to achieve an accumulated effect. In
this way, the center is seeking to foster exchange experiences
and cohesion in the region to raise the likelihood
of meeting CLEAR objectives.
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
contributions to outcome aRea:
contributions to outcome aReas:
Contributing to the Body of Knowledge on M&E
CLEAR Latin America has added to the body of knowledge on M&E
in the region by developing and sharing M&E publications with key
experts. Examples include:
• Monitoring, Evaluation and Results Based Management. Learning
and South-South Cooperation for Innovation: The Role of
Subnational Actors
• Strengthening Management by Results
• Analysis of the Operation of CCTs at Times of Natural Disasters
(Mexico-Colombia)
Strengthened capacity to
produce and use evidence
Expanded professional
expertise in regions
contributions to outcome aReas:
21
Cross-Regional Learning
The CLEAR program provides a unique opportunity for the
regional centers to collaborate and exchange knowledge
and experiences, promote regional networks, and organize
events that allow participants from different countries
to meet and share lessons in M&E. Two key events took
place in FY14.
Mexico-Africa South-South Collaboration
and Learning
InNovember 2013, CLEAR Latin America and CLEAR Anglophone
Africa co-organized the “South-South Roundtable
on Using Evidence for Better Policy Making and Practice,”
along with the National Council for the Evaluation of
Social Development Policy of Mexico (CONE VAL), the
Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation
of the Presidency of South Africa (DPME), and the Policy
Coordination and Delivery Unit of the Presidency of the
Republic of Ghana.
This initiative brought together a range of government
and parliamentary leaders from Benin, Colombia, Ghana,
India, Mexico, Peru, South Africa, and Uganda to exchange
knowledge and further develop practice in the area of
policy development based on evidence generation and use.
The roundtable did not follow a conventional conference
format—it aimed at fostering highly interactive conversations
to maximize exchange and learning among peers.
An important output of the roundtable was a set of country
action plans for taking the M&E practices forward in each
participating country. The plans took into consideration
learning and insights from the interactions.
Mexico-India Learning
India’s first independent evaluation office was formally
launched in 2013. The office was modeled on the lines of
Mexico’s CONE VAL. CLEAR South Asia helped to organize
the launch and invited M&E experts from Mexico to share
lessons with India’s experts and government agencies.
Although this office no longer exists under the new Indian
government, lessons regarding the independence of
evaluation, and the central governments’ role in monitoring
performance, may potentially be useful as structures/
processes are defined under the new government.
Global Approach
CLEAR anchors the overall program with its global
approach, by generating and facilitating internationally
benchmarked knowledge and capacity development in
M&E, supporting peer learning among the regional centers,
and building international brand recognition.
Global Forum in Mexico
One important way CLEAR has promoted global knowledge
exchange in M&E capacity development is through the
global fora, where CLEAR members—Centers, the Board,
and Secretariat—convene to discuss the program, refine
strategy, and learn from each other. These fora have been
organized in Paris (June 2011), Accra (January 2012), and
Tunis (February 2013).
For FY14, the forum took place in Mexico City in November
2013 and was hosted by CIDE . This forum was the first
global meeting directly hosted and organized by a center.
It provided an opportunity for participants to learn from
Latin American good practices and experiences in M&E,
as well as the ongoing debates regarding the consolidation
of M&E and performance management systems. It
also offered occasions for interaction between academia,
top civil society and business leaders, as well as the M&E
community of practice, that will facilitate future collaborations
among centers.
New Center in Brazil
CLEAR is expanding its regional and linguistic reach by
adding a center in Brazil, which will also work with Lusophone
Africa. The competitive selection process was
completed in November 2013, and the center, based at
the Getúlio Vargas Foundation in Brazil, is expected to
start operations in early 2015. The CLEAR Brazil Center
will partner with institutions in Northeast Brazil and collaborate
with the CLEAR Latin America Center in other
regional activities across Latin America. In addition, the
center plans to provide services to Portuguese-speaking
countries in Africa.
Expansion to Pacific Region
CLEAR made a commitment to serve the needs of Pacific
Islanders with funding from AusAID. CLEAR worked with
the Islands Center for Public Administration at the University
of the South Pacific to provide two trainings in basic
M&E to participants from across the region.
22
Updated Overall Strategy
CLEAR developed its original strategy and charter in
2010; the program updated the strategy in FY14 to reflect
experiences and lessons from the first three years of onthe-ground
implementation. The strategy incorporated
the ideas of the institutions participating in the program,
taking into account the rapidly changing context for M&E
supply and demand—more active communities of practice
in M&E, international academic institutions and programs
engaged in research and capacity building, and greater
national and international emphasis not just on monitoring
but also on evaluation, using a variety of approaches.
With the launch of phase II of the program, the strategy
will again be renewed on the basis of the new vision, mission,
charter, a theory of change, and an explicit approach
to innovation management.
CLEAR Network Support
Coordinating the program website: CLEAR maintained
and regularly updated its website throughout FY14, offering
visitors convenient and direct access to important
documents, meeting information, and individual center
websites. For FY14, 63% of website visitors came to the
site for the first time, and 37% of overall website visits
were from repeat users. The number of pages viewed
totaled more than 25,700. The top five countries of origin
for website visitors were the United States, India, United
Kingdom, South Africa, and Brazil.
Setting guidance and standards for capacity building:
CLEAR developed a Quality Assurance Conceptual
Framework to assist the CLEAR Centers in ensuring that
the capacity building services they provide meet highquality
standards. The framework is based on a review of
the literature on quality assurance and capacity development
and the experience of the CLEAR Centers’ own host
organizations’ procedures.
23
Building on a rich set of achievements, experiences, and
mid-term evaluation findings and recommendations
(October 2014) CLEAR is now ready to enter into its mature
second phase. In-depth stocktaking and discussions at
the Board retreat in Washington, DC, in July 2014, and
the Leadership retreat (Centers, Board, and Secretariat)
in Dublin, in September 2014, led to consensus on the
way forward.
CLEAR intends to keep the things that are valuable but
will work purposefully and strategically to share innovations
in how to build evaluation capacity, develop global
knowledge, and expand its network of partnerships to
draw on local, regional, and global ideas.
CLEAR has learned that:
• CLEAR is relevant and has achieved its targets. CLEAR
has been and remains relevant in light of the global and
countries’ own discourse on results management and
aid effectiveness. Because of the positive assessment
of program delivery so far, there is confidence CLEAR
can achieve long-term results.
• CLEAR needs to better generate and manage knowledge.
CLEAR has not yet systematically captured what
works or does not work in evaluation capacity development.
There is a need for knowledge generation and
sharing to be a much more deliberate way to advance
learning and innovations in M&E globally.
• CLEAR needs to adjust its management and governance
structures to fit a more mature phase.
Now entering a more mature phase of the program,
CLEAR must have stronger leadership to guide strategic
and operational matters and the knowledge
agenda. A new governance structure would give the
program a fuller set of experiences and diverse views.
CLEAR is taking decisive steps to maximize its potential
and drive change as the program moves forward. Some
of the key areas of focus include:
Generating and managing knowledge. CLEAR will be
transforming from a “delivery initiative” to a “learning
and delivery initiative” that focuses no only on delivering
evaluation capacity but also generating and sharing
key knowledge. The program will stress the “how to” of
evaluation capacity building by systematically harvesting
and sharing insights and experiences regarding evaluation
capacity development.
Revising the theory of change and results frameworks.
CLEAR is revising the program’s theory of change, including
an updated results framework and core indicators to
reflect success and/or failures of the CLEAR program as
a whole and of the CLEAR Centers individually. The program
is now in the position to create underlying learning
questions and to test hypotheses regarding building
evaluation capacity.
Revising CLEAR’s governance and management. Profound
governance and management changes are already
underway, including having the Board’s Chair take on a
stronger leadership role and strategic and operational
oversight, replacing the current Board with a Governance
Council that will include all centers and major donors. This
will enable CLEAR to have greater legitimacy in the eyes
of its stakeholders, ensure effective leadership on operational
matters, and drive longer-term strategic decisions
on the future of CLEAR more effectively. The program is
looking at ways to grow a stronger network partnership
and how diversity in regional representation, experience,
and expertise can strengthen the global agenda.
It is an exciting time for CLEAR as the program moves
forward into its second phase.
For more information about the mid-term evaluation and
Board response to recommendations, visit the website
at www.theclearinitiative.org to access the documents.
The Way Forward
aspire
realistically
work
purposefully
collaborate
fittingly
24
Results (Outcomes) Key Performance Indicators
Highest-Level Outcomes to
which CLEAR Contributes
Stakeholders use evidence
in making decisions for
improved development
results
1. By 2018, 70 percent of strategic clients and stakeholders surveyed report increased use of
evidence in decision making
Higher-Level Outcomes to
which CLEAR Contributes
Strengthened contextspecific
M&E systems and
practices
2. By 2018, an external evaluation commissioned by the Board indicates that centers have
contributed to strengthening of M&E systems.
3. By 2018, an external evaluation commissioned by the Board indicates that at least 70
percent of CLEAR clients are using the knowledge, skills, or information they gained to
raise evaluation practice
CLEAR’S Outcomes
Regional Learning
• Enhanced enabling environment and strengthened demand
• Strengthened organizational capacity to produce and use evidence
• Critical mass of professional expertise developed
• Innovation in M&E
Activities to be determined by each center and results captured by specific programs and
projects conducted
Results (Outputs) Key Performance Indicators
Regional Learning
CLEAR Program-Level
Outputs
Strategically chosen
capacity building outputs
and activities of quality
implemented regionally
1. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their work plans the capacity to address a
range of M&E topics and methodologies (increase from baseline).
2. By their third year, centers demonstrate in their annual work plan the capacity to offer
capacity building through a variety of modalities aimed at different capacity objectives
(increase from baseline, by center).
3. By their third year, at least 50 percent of each center’s clients are from outside of the
center’s home country (by center).
4. By their 3rd year, at least 80 percent of the center’s clients score the quality of service as a
4 or higher (on a five-point scale, by center).
5. By 2018, an external evaluation indicates that the centers are functioning well with respect
to their strategic plans and objectives
CLEAR Program-Level
Outputs
Regional Centers Established
and Functional
1. By 2012, five centers selected and operational (original target was four).
2. By 2018, an external evaluation indicates that the centers are functioning well with respect
to their strategic plans and objectives
3. By 2018, centers’ percent of revenue-generating activities and programs increase from
baseline (targets will vary center to center)
Global Approach
Outcomes of Global
Learning
• CLEAR global knowledge
• Peer-learning through the
network
1. By 2018, center directors and staff report that they have been able to apply knowledge
gained from other regional centers through the CLEAR initiative
2. By 2018, the regional centers choose to continuing sharing knowledge and expertise
through a global network
3. By 2018, a survey of strategic clients and stakeholders indicate that at least 80 percent
recognize the CLEAR global brand as a source of excellence and innovation in M&E
APPENDIX 1: CLEAR’s Outcomes and Outputs [Based on FY14 CLEAR theory of change, currently under revision]
25
APPENDIX 2: Overview of Program-Level Work Program
Key Tasks,
Milestones, and
Deliverables
Period/
Completion
Date
Deliverables/Targets Status (cumulative) Status
(July 2013-June 2014)
REGIONAL APPROACH
Regional Centers
Selected
2010–12 Background studies and
consultations with regional
experts
Demand assessment studies
Development of selection
criteria
Five centers selected
Five centers selected
by 2012
Brazil center (additional
center) has been
selected and is expected
to start operations in
FY2015.
Regional Centers
Operational
2011–18 Annual work plans, annual
reviews, strategy updates
Reports produced
2012, 2013
Annual report, 2014
Strategies to be updated
in the next reporting
period based on the
outcomes of the MidTerm
Evaluation, Board
Retreat in Washington,
DC, and CLEAR
Leadership Retreat in
Dublin.
GLOBAL LEARNING
Global knowledge
and capacity
2011–18 One international knowledge
product/capacity building
approach developed,
per year
Developed and/or
delivered
• Impact
evaluation
• Performance-based
budgeting
• M&E fundamentals • M&E fundamentals (2)
Delivered
2011–18 Global program mentoring
for implementing
knowledge/capacity
approaches, on demand
and based on centers’ work
programs
Mentoring and
facilitation with experts
provided to all centers
Ongoing
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Key Tasks,
Milestones, and
Deliverables
Period/
Completion
Date
Deliverables/Targets Status (cumulative) Status
(July 2013-June 2014)
Peer Learning 2011–18 Annual global forum
once per year, designed
in collaboration with the
sponsoring center.
2011/Paris
2012/Accra
2013/Tunis
2014/Mexico
Network Support 2011–18 Quality assurance guidelines,
by end 2013
Operations manual, by end
2014
Network development
activities—ongoing
Website, dissemination, and
communications—ongoing
Taskforces on
governance (report)
Knowledge-sharing
through website
design (report)
Website—ongoing
Quality assurance
framework for
Implementing Capacity
Building Programs
Operations manual draft
(to be updated after
Mid-Term Evaluation)
Website (ongoing)
GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT
Board Meetings
Secretariat Work
program
Approval of Work
programs
Reporting
Monitoring
Evaluation
2010–18
2010–18
2010–18
2010–18
2013–18
Twice/year
Annual
Quarterly; annual reports
Quarterly; twice-yearly on
site
Midterm by 2013 and final
by 2018
Ongoing
2012-2013 plan
prepared
Ongoing
Ongoing
Updated one to be
prepared after Mid-Term
Evaluation.
Board chair visit to all
centers. Secretariat
staff visit, once to each
center.
Independent Mid-Term
Evaluation. Finalized in
October 2014..
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APPENDIX 3: Contributions to the Program, and Expenditures and Projections
Table 1: Contributions to CLEAR, by Donor Agency (As of June 2014)
Funding Agency Receipts and Commitments
Asian Development Bank $ 450,000.00
African Development Bank $100,000
Australian Government - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade $1,135,410
Belgium $147,411
Department for International Development—UK $4,665,745
Inter-American Development Bank $900,000
Rockefeller Foundation $2,500,000
Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development $327,879
Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency $4,689,949
World Bank Institutional Development Fund (IDF)/Direct Cash to Center $995,790
World Bank IEG Cash Contribution* $72,000
Total $16,109,508
Total (non-World Bank) $15,041,718
Donor Funds Receipts Only $14,298,352
*Note: In addition, the World Bank/IEG contributes approximately $400,000/year.
Table 2: CLEAR Expenditures and Projections, by Fiscal Year and Component (As of June 2014)
Category Total Planned
FY10-20
Expenditures
and
Commitments
FY10-14
Projected
FY15
Projected
FY16
Projected
FY17
Projected
FY18-201
Regional: Grants
(Expenditures
by Center +
Commitments)
$14,356,024 $8,106,024 $450,000 $2,350,000 $1,800,000 $1,650,000
Regional: Direct
Support, Demand
Assessment,
Selection
$1,383,634 $853,634 $150,000 $130,000 $100,000 $150,000
Global $2,509, 244 $477,244 $487,000 $535,000 $535,000 $455,000
Governance and
Management $1,202,482 $184,482 $277,000 $247,000 $247,000 $247,000
Administration Fee $659,241 $379,241 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000
Total $20,110,625 $10,000,625 $1,434,000 $3,232,000 $2,752,000 $2,572,000
Note: Includes the multi-donor trust fund and the institutional development fund (IDF).
1 The extension to 2020 is to be discussed and finalized with the funding agencies.
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Figure 1: Expenditures and Commitments Through FY14, by Center (%)
472316518
Anglophone Africa
47%
South Asia
23%
Francophone Africa
16%
East Asia
5%
Pacific
1%
Latin America:
Spanish Speaking
8%
Figure 2: Summary Projections Through FY20, by Center (%)
352318849+3
Anglophone Africa
35%
South Asia
23%
Francophone Africa
18%
East Asia
8%
Pacific
4%
Latin America:
Spanish Speaking
9%
Latin America:
Lusophone
3%
total: $8.1 million
total : $14.1 million
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APPENDIX 4: Governance and Management1
CLEAR ’s governance and management structure comprises
a Board, the centers’ Regional Advisory Committees
(RACs), and the Secretariat housed at the Independent
Evaluation Group (IEG ) of the World Bank Group. This
arrangement is now changing as CLEAR institutes a
new governance and management system.
Board
The Board is CLEAR ’s main high-level decision-making
body and comprises member representatives from donors
to the trust fund managed by the World Bank Group. The
Board is chaired by the IEG of the World Bank Group. The
Board can invite participation in its meetings from nonBoard
members (such as the centers’ RA Cs or experts
and officials from partner countries), as appropriate.
The Board meets to set goals and policy directions for
the program, reviews and approves work program and
budgets, and commissions independent evaluations of
the CLEAR program.
Regional Advisory Committees
Governance at the level of the centers includes RA Cs,
which provide advice and guidance regarding the centers’
strategies and work programs based on their expertise
and knowledge of regional issues with respect to M&E.
This governance structure is to ensure participant diversity,
country input, and stakeholder support.
Secretariat
The Secretariat develops the overall strategy, supports
the planning and implementation of the work plans of the
centers, contributes to the global program, executes the
Board’s decisions, and handles the administration of funds.
1 To be changed in early 2015 based on recommendations from the mid-term evaluation.
30
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Board Members and Staff from Donor Agencies
Monika Weber-Fahr
IEG, The World Bank (Chair)
Rakesh Nangia
African Development Bank (AfDB)
Vinod Thomas
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
Deborah Bowman
Australian Government—Department of Foreign Affairs
and Trade (DFAT)
Kellie Plummer
Australian Government—Department of Foreign Affairs
and Trade (DFAT)
Jacqueline Lienard
Belgian Development Cooperation Agency
Cheryl Gray
Inter-American Development Bank
Nancy MacPherson
Rockefeller Foundation
Lennart Peck
Swedish International Development
Co-operation Agency (SIDA)
Valerie Rossi
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
David Rider Smith
UK Department for International Development (DfID)
CLEAR Centers—Leadership
Anglophone Africa
Tim Clynick (Interim Director)
Stephen Porter (Director until February 2014)
Charles Amoatey (Ghana)
James Obuya Bagaka (Kenya)
Francophone Africa
Boubacar Aw
El Hadji Gueye (Director until February 2014)
Mady Koanda (Burkina Faso)
East Asia
Li Kouqing
Zhao Min
South Asia
John Floretta
Urmy Shukla
Diva Dhar
Gemma Stevenson (Pakistan)
Latin America
Claudia Maldonado
Cristina Galindez
CLEAR Secretariat
Nidhi Khatrri, Head
Ximena Fernandez Ordonez
Naoko Hosaka
Maria Gabriela Padrino
Esperanza Sadiua
Arianne Wessal
Maurya West Meiers
For more information, visit
www.theclearinitiative.org
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